Twist of the Wrist- riding techniques - Honda RC51 Forum : RC51 Motorcycle Forums
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
post #1 of 8 (permalink) Old 04-10-2011, 04:14 PM Thread Starter
Lifetime Premium
 
gts455's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Deutschland/Colorado Springs
Posts: 3,169
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Quoted: 37 Post(s)
Twist of the Wrist- riding techniques

I've been doing a lot of reading and research on how to make myself a better rider, on and off the track. I'm 25 and have been riding for 4 years now. i am not a seasonal rider, i ride all year round and have a ton of learning to still do on better technique. Thought it would be cool to post up what techniques i'm working on and to hear what you guys are doing to improve yourselves.

I guess i should start off by giving some important works for newer guys to check out.

First off check out all of Keith Code's books and DVD's. Twist of the wrist is one of the best works for the new rider. Keith is well known in the motorcycle world for being one of the best riding instructors. He's the founder of the now famous California Superbike School and also has another school Code R.A.C.E. geared to the track. Brilliant man.

Another good source is Nick Ienatsch and his book Sport Riding Techniques.
Many of the Same techniques as Kieth Code but this book helps explain a few things a bit more clear and provides some good pictures. If any of you have this book, the RC51 Nick is riding throughout the book is my RC. It used to be his personal bike.....and i still have his race fairings he gave with the bike when he sold it.


Now on to what i've been practicing.

-Body position, i find myself often sliding to close to the tank and have been making a point to keep that perfect distance to keep from locking out my arms and keeping my arms nice and relaxed. Also been working on body movement on the seat.....maintaining a lower center of gravity in the seat by sliding my butt across the seat rather then lifting my weight off the seat to the side i am leaning. That alone has made a huge difference for me. you can really feel how your body weight effects the bikes traction and stability.

-Braking, using front and rear and different pressures to control weight shift and trying to control load on the front suspension while maintaining traction on the rear.For new riders, first find an empty parking lot and practice smoothly braking (first from a slower speed then from normal cruising speed. provide yourself with plenty of open space and "runoff" room). learn to feel the point where your brakes lock up and lose traction so that you can recognise when this is happening in a real situation and will be able to correct it.
I've also found i use the rear brake far more then i should and sometimes don't use the front brake to its full potential. Been trying to incorporate more front brake (70 percent of braking power is from the front brake) and smoothing out my brake pressure both on the front and rear to come to a quick stop without losing control of the bike and avoiding locking up the rear.

-Proper downshifts, blips, and two finger front brake/throttle control. Not to hard but takes sometime getting used to. Many riders mistakenly use engine braking which causes clutch plate and engine components to wear. Blipping the throttle on downshifts is essential for bikes without a slipper clutch. matching the engine speed to the gear and wheel speed is super important and will smooth out shifts, eliminate that forward lurch from an improper downshift and reduce load on the front forks before a turn,and eliminate rear wheel snake.
I've also been trying to better calculate my downshifts....i've noticed many times i've downshifted more gears then necessary and have taken corners in 2nd gear when it was really better suited for 3rd or even 4th gear (long sweeping turn) then forcing me to shift while in the turn. Probably the biggest learning point for me this weekend was the two finger brake throttle control while downshifting and braking. I have smaller hands so its not very comfortable for me even with levers adjusted close....could be my gloves too, they need to be broken in a bit more. Controlling both at the same time is not hard but is going to require some practice. I think it is imperative as it improves your reaction time in emergency situations and provides immediate braking and throttle control without moving your hands from one to the other.


Well, hope this helps newer forum riders and maybe opens up some minds to learn better motorcyle control and techniques that will increase your reaction time and skill in those "OH SHIT" scenarios . would love to hear others techniques, experiences, and to hear what you guys are working on to improve your riding technique.

2001 Honda RC51 SP1
1996 Honda CBR 900RR
2003 Aprilia RSV Mille R
1999 Aprilia RS50
2012 Triumph Daytona 675R (Sold)
2010 BMW S1000RR (Sold)
2005 Yamaha R6 (Sold)
gts455 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
post #2 of 8 (permalink) Old 04-10-2011, 04:15 PM Thread Starter
Lifetime Premium
 
gts455's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Deutschland/Colorado Springs
Posts: 3,169
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Quoted: 37 Post(s)
Also feel free to list other books, DVDs, and riding schools

2001 Honda RC51 SP1
1996 Honda CBR 900RR
2003 Aprilia RSV Mille R
1999 Aprilia RS50
2012 Triumph Daytona 675R (Sold)
2010 BMW S1000RR (Sold)
2005 Yamaha R6 (Sold)
gts455 is offline  
post #3 of 8 (permalink) Old 04-10-2011, 06:45 PM
Member
 
MysteryMan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Canberra Australia
Posts: 91
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Yes Very impressive book.

He also has the "California Superbike School" here in Australia.

I have done four sessions and connot praise their teaching enough.

My only gripe is im a seasonal rider and therefore am unable to practise as much as i would like. But the school is amazing with its tuitition.

The Best Thing About Pain,
It Lets You Know You're Still Alive!!

"To those who judge me, have mercy upon my soul,
for i have walked a sinful path, in my quest for clarity"

Aussie Rider with 05 SP2. Dassualt, PCIII,
Smoked d/bubble, Corbin, Flapper, Smoked h/light Covers.
Devil eye conversion. Yoshi RS3, Flush mounts, Magical Racing C/F Hugger.

http://i79.photobucket.com/albums/j1...evilseyes1.jpg
MysteryMan is offline  
 
post #4 of 8 (permalink) Old 04-10-2011, 07:29 PM Thread Starter
Lifetime Premium
 
gts455's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Deutschland/Colorado Springs
Posts: 3,169
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Quoted: 37 Post(s)
yeah, there is a Brit show called UK superbike school about CSS in England. its 6 episodes featuring 3 riders all with different levels of experience and it shows them going through the classes. Pretty interesting show if you get your hands on it, give a lot of good basic rider information.

2001 Honda RC51 SP1
1996 Honda CBR 900RR
2003 Aprilia RSV Mille R
1999 Aprilia RS50
2012 Triumph Daytona 675R (Sold)
2010 BMW S1000RR (Sold)
2005 Yamaha R6 (Sold)
gts455 is offline  
post #5 of 8 (permalink) Old 04-10-2011, 08:01 PM
Lifetime Premium
 
RVT1KR's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Fussia City, Japan
Posts: 65
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Quoted: 1 Post(s)
Total control -
High Performance Street Riding Techniques

by Lee Parks is another really good book worth reading.
RVT1KR is offline  
post #6 of 8 (permalink) Old 04-10-2011, 08:58 PM
Senior Member
 
Idrivetoys's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2011
Location: Yuma AZ
Posts: 365
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Through the Marine corps i have attended 6 ARTD (advanced rider track days) in which one of Kieth code's coaches from the California superbike school instructs (usually Lonnie)

i have also went through two AMOS coursed which is a slightly abbreviated course from the 2 day course given at the califorinia superbike school at which there are several coaches and Kieth Code himself instructs at.

all that to say they teach the points in the twist of the wrist DVDs and books and provide valuable information and rider critique/advice to become a better motorcycle rider, i have another course coming up may 22 and cant wait as its my first amos course on the RC51.




Idrivetoys is offline  
post #7 of 8 (permalink) Old 04-10-2011, 11:27 PM
Junior Member
 
pannetron's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: Colorado high country
Posts: 26
Mentioned: 0 Post(s)
Quoted: 0 Post(s)
Another excellent book is "


" by Nick Ienatsch.
pannetron is offline  
post #8 of 8 (permalink) Old 04-10-2011, 11:38 PM Thread Starter
Lifetime Premium
 
gts455's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Deutschland/Colorado Springs
Posts: 3,169
Mentioned: 4 Post(s)
Quoted: 37 Post(s)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Idrivetoys View Post
Through the Marine corps i have attended 6 ARTD (advanced rider track days) in which one of Kieth code's coaches from the California superbike school instructs (usually Lonnie)

i have also went through two AMOS coursed which is a slightly abbreviated course from the 2 day course given at the califorinia superbike school at which there are several coaches and Kieth Code himself instructs at.

all that to say they teach the points in the twist of the wrist DVDs and books and provide valuable information and rider critique/advice to become a better motorcycle rider, i have another course coming up may 22 and cant wait as its my first amos course on the RC51.




Thats pretty sweet the Marine Corps does that for you guys. The army doesn't do anything like this besides the MSF course which is basically a rider license test.

Quote:
Originally Posted by pannetron View Post
Another excellent book is "Sport Riding Techniques" by Nick Ienatsch.

Yep, like i said in my original post it is another awesome book. Nick makes a lot of good points and builds on some of the things Keith explains in Twist of the Wrist. A lot more photo examples as well.

2001 Honda RC51 SP1
1996 Honda CBR 900RR
2003 Aprilia RSV Mille R
1999 Aprilia RS50
2012 Triumph Daytona 675R (Sold)
2010 BMW S1000RR (Sold)
2005 Yamaha R6 (Sold)
gts455 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Reply

Quick Reply
Message:
Options

Register Now



In order to be able to post messages on the Honda RC51 Forum : RC51 Motorcycle Forums forums, you must first register.
Please enter your desired user name, your email address and other required details in the form below.

User Name:
Password
Please enter a password for your user account. Note that passwords are case-sensitive.

Password:


Confirm Password:
Email Address
Please enter a valid email address for yourself.

Email Address:
OR

Log-in










Thread Tools
Show Printable Version Show Printable Version
Email this Page Email this Page
Display Modes
Linear Mode Linear Mode



Posting Rules  
You may post new threads
You may post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On

 
For the best viewing experience please update your browser to Google Chrome