Cornering, i am afraid to lean ! - Honda RC51 Forum : RC51 Motorcycle Forums
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post #1 of 59 (permalink) Old 05-26-2011, 09:28 PM Thread Starter
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Cornering, i am afraid to lean !

Help.

I have just bought q2's for my bike.
So i should have confidence in them, but i dont.
Im still very scared to lean...
I lean somewhat, but theres always still about 2 inches on each side of my tires...

Someone help

does the tire actually slide sometimes ?
And it catches again ?

Or will i just go down

talk to me please.
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post #2 of 59 (permalink) Old 05-26-2011, 09:46 PM
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I would say the best thing is try and locate a riding school at the closest track to you.
You will get valuable instruction and advice that will greatly improve your riding ability.
It's not how to become a racer (there's other schools for that), but to be a more skilled rider.

When I was a kid, I found riding dirt bikes on dirt roads or sand helped a lot with throttle control and body placement.
You'll find most road racing champions have raced, or practice with, dirt bikes for that reason.
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post #3 of 59 (permalink) Old 05-26-2011, 09:52 PM
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I'm not sure where Hillsdale, NY is but you really can't be too far from NJMP, Pocono, Loudon, Beverun or even Summit Point. Pick a place that is close, do a track day and really learn how to ride your bike.

OK, Loudon is your closest track, Tony's track days runs there as well as the Penguine race school. However, I would truck my ass down to NJ Motorsports Park, pick a track day org and take the entry class. Loudon, is a small tight track and you're really going to have to work the RC around that place. NJMP is much bigger and it will allow you to really stretch the RC's legs.

Good luck!

Last edited by njracer; 05-26-2011 at 10:00 PM.
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post #4 of 59 (permalink) Old 05-26-2011, 10:21 PM Thread Starter
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Thanks guys, any pointers in the mean time, i drive a 2500 dodge, so i have to wait till i have some extra money
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post #5 of 59 (permalink) Old 05-26-2011, 10:42 PM
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lean into the turn, chest over the tank, chin up, look where you want to go, keep your outside leg hugged into the tank and the balls of your feet on the pegs, arms a little loose, DO NOT KUNG FU GRIP THE BARS.


Yes, be comfortable with your tires, heres a quick how to


Approach turn, located the turn in spot, set your line and lean angle while looking where you want to go (ie the apex)
after your line is set and your lean is set too, smoothly evenly and consistently roll on the throttle as the bike returns to its stable upright position. DO NOT add lean angle with throttle, it happens from time to time but try not to do it.

I have done several courses through the marine corps give by the California super bike school and this is the basis for their instruction on entry speed, lean angle, throttle control, rider position, and line, and it works.



Will the tire slide? possibly, typically from loss of traction when you catch some sand or something but not likely under regular riding conditions. if you follow the steps above you should be pretty stable. When you apply the throttle nice and smooth after setting your lean you actually make the bike more stable than just coasting through a turn. pick a turn your comfortable with and practice it, get really comfy with the above things and then start applying them elsewhere, practice in safe areas, i like to go to a parking lot sometimes with spread out light poles and do figure 8s getting more and more comfortable with my position in turns and setting entry points.


ALWAYS lean into the turn, to not have your body countering the lean of the bike, this will cause more lean angle of he bike and you fighting the lean which causes the suspension not to work adequately and since the suspension keeps the tires firmly planted you want to lean with the bike

Last edited by Idrivetoys; 05-26-2011 at 11:01 PM.
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post #6 of 59 (permalink) Old 05-26-2011, 11:44 PM
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Originally Posted by Sicko28 View Post
Help.

I have just bought q2's for my bike.
So i should have confidence in them, but i dont.
Im still very scared to lean...
I lean somewhat, but theres always still about 2 inches on each side of my tires...

Someone help

does the tire actually slide sometimes ?
And it catches again ?

Or will i just go down

talk to me please.
Maybe your leaning plenty for the speed and the corners your taking.

If you have 2 inch chicken strips you have a lot of lean left in the tires.

Go to the bookstore and pick up Total Control by Lee Parks or Sport Riding Techniques by Nick Ienatcsh or Proficient Motorcycling by Daivd Hough.

Keep your eyes up and look around the corners as far as you can see. If your looking 10 feet in front of your wheel you feel like your going faster than you really are. Position your bike at the outside of the lane at corner entry.
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post #7 of 59 (permalink) Old 05-27-2011, 07:47 AM
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Well done for being honest and asking for help.

Sounds like you probably haven't done a lot of riding before getting an RC51. It's quite a heavy bike with quite a lot of engine braking, so it's not really the ideal bike to learn to throw around.

If you can afford it, buy a smaller cheaper old bike, maybe a 250 2-stroke single cylinder enduro with fairly sticky street biased tyres. Learn to throw it around, flick it into corners, power out of corners, do small wheelies and bring it down, etc. You'll have fun and learn at a much slower pace but also quickly understand how to counter steer and throw a bike into corners and wrestle a lightweight bike around.

When you're done, clean it up well, sell it and you should be able to get your money back. Should you drop it whilst learning it won't do the bike much damage...if any at all. These bikes are designed to go down. Do some off roading too - you'll learn lots.

You'll probably save yourself a lot of expense this way compared to making mistakes on an RC51 which can be very expensive, or cause you to need plastic chinese copy fairings...

If you can't afford a second bike, then begin by always being cautious and going into a corner slow, then fast out. Never, ever panic and brake mid corner or stand the bike up, it can be a lot more dangerous, for example putting you on the wrong side of the road as the bike then wants you to go straight.

If you have good tyres like say Bridgestone BT003's and you can ride smoothly, there's not much likelyhood you'll ever exceed the grip available on clean dry road conditions, but the golden rule is to never, ever ride beyond your ability. It's the no. 1 cause of accidents, often serious.

Do get some training, but be sure to learn at your own pace.
Once you're comfortable there's no reason you shouldn't be able to wear your tyres all the way to the edge on a track-day & more. Have fun.

Last edited by The Stig; 05-27-2011 at 08:06 AM.
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post #8 of 59 (permalink) Old 05-27-2011, 08:12 AM
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Originally Posted by Pardini View Post
Go to the bookstore and pick up Total Control by Lee Parks or Sport Riding Techniques by Nick Ienatcsh or Proficient Motorcycling by Daivd Hough.
Sport riding techniques is an excellent book. Also check out Twist of the wrist by keith code.
When i began riding i did not have anyone to learn from either. what i would do is pick a technique from those two books. read through what both have to say and then i'd get out there and try it out. i also kept a journal and wrote down how the bike felt, how it reacted, what new things i was trying, and what i should try to improve next session. The books really help....and if you have any other questions about techniques or certain things in the book get on the forum and ask and someone will be able to clarify.

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post #9 of 59 (permalink) Old 05-27-2011, 09:16 AM
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Grow up in England, you learn to lean pretty quickly over there!

On a serious note, MCN (a motorcycle rag in England) has plenty of videos on YouTube which will show you how to corner and drag a knee.

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post #10 of 59 (permalink) Old 05-27-2011, 11:40 AM
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Check your tire pressure. Im dilligent about that. And i love q2's. I've found them to be very stable for my area and riding. Check ur air gauge against a couple others so you know its accurate. Assuming a 80 degree day, dry, and normal condition roads and rider weight of 180 (and suspension compression-rebound-preload all set pretty close for your weight) I run my rear @ 36 and my front @34. If you search, there's a thread about tire pressures everyone is running.
Getting your pressure right for your bike and rider weight, combined with proper suspension settings is real important for cornering and all around handling. I've been tweaking and experimenting for the last 10 rides or so, and have learned my bikes limits and capabilities pretty well. You could also search for a 'standard suspension settings', dial your bike in as it says, and ride and adjust from there. That worked real good for me.

John, 2000 RC51 #000100


Last edited by jondog9; 05-27-2011 at 12:06 PM.
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