Carbone Lorraine - Honda RC51 Forum : RC51 Motorcycle Forums
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post #1 of 9 (permalink) Old 09-23-2015, 12:46 PM Thread Starter
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Carbone Lorraine

i recently fitted some CL pads to my bike and after 1000km they have stared to squeak when braking any ideas?

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post #2 of 9 (permalink) Old 09-23-2015, 02:02 PM
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FAQ

Braketech's site...numerous Q and A in their tech forum...scroll down to the bottom for "why do my brakes squeal?"
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post #3 of 9 (permalink) Old 09-23-2015, 02:27 PM
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1. What pad compound were you using prior to installing the Carbonne Lorraine?

2. Did you remove the old compound from the rotors before you installed the new pads?

3. Are your calipers dirty & dusty?
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post #4 of 9 (permalink) Old 09-23-2015, 03:30 PM
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Speaking of cleaning the rotors prior to new pads: What do you use?
Scotchbrite? Sandpaper? Some chemical?

I've always used the red (course) scotchbrite and called it good. Is that good enough?

John, 2000 RC51 #000100

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post #5 of 9 (permalink) Old 09-23-2015, 03:37 PM
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The best way to do it is by glass bead blasting the rotor surface, but I realize not everyone has a bead blasting cabinet in their garage (like I do ) so a cheap alternative is to use a maroon scotch-brite pad and some Simple Green and a lot of elbow grease to scrub both sides of the rotors & I mean scrub... It takes a lot of effort and about 5 minutes per each side of the rotor to get that metal residue off the rotors & your fingers will ache when you are done, but the end result is worth it & be sure to rinse the Simple Green off thoroughly too.

Also be aware of certain spray can Brake Cleaners. Many of them leave an invisible film that coats the rotor and reduces the effectiveness of your new pads.
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post #6 of 9 (permalink) Old 09-30-2015, 12:47 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jondog9 View Post
Speaking of cleaning the rotors prior to new pads: What do you use?

Here is the ultimate way to clean and resurface your rotors, far and above sanding away with coarse papers or Scotchbrite and hurting your damn fingers in the process: Flex-Hone for Rotors, Hone Tools, Flex Hones



I did this a few years ago. I put the hone it a hulking, low speed drill like this (450 rpm):

And had a pal (VFR owner!) run a wire-wheel or similar thing on the tire to rotate the rotor at a nice, even speed, something like 20-30 rpm for the wheel assembly, depending on wire-wheel diameter and drill speed. It's not critical, but that rpm makes for a sweet hone pattern on the rotors:




After doing the "outsides" of the rotors, I removed the wheel and swapped sides (temporarily) and did the "insides" which were now outside.

Here's the result, before and after photos:





This effort totally eliminated a little chatter I had in a set of fairly new and very straight rotors. Light braking pressure is rewarded with the smoothest, most progressive feel you can imagine.

Of course as LDH said, glass-beading is great if you have it available, but.....it only cleans (perfectly). It doesn't provide that nice hone pattern.

And if you want to do this and NOT replace pads with lots of meat left on them, simply buff the pads on rough, clean concrete for a few seconds (really!) to get a new surface.
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Last edited by Trace; 09-30-2015 at 12:55 PM.
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post #7 of 9 (permalink) Old 09-30-2015, 12:49 PM
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Also works for cleaning up parts to make them look new again



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post #8 of 9 (permalink) Old 12-27-2015, 07:08 PM
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These honing discs come in coarse, medium and fine.
The medium is 120 grit, the fine is 240.
Which grit would be best for OEM rotors?
Ready to drop the hammer on one...

Quote:
Originally Posted by Trace View Post
Here is the ultimate way to clean and resurface your rotors, far and above sanding away with coarse papers or Scotchbrite and hurting your damn fingers in the process: Flex-Hone for Rotors, Hone Tools, Flex Hones



I did this a few years ago. I put the hone it a hulking, low speed drill like this (450 rpm):

And had a pal (VFR owner!) run a wire-wheel or similar thing on the tire to rotate the rotor at a nice, even speed, something like 20-30 rpm for the wheel assembly, depending on wire-wheel diameter and drill speed. It's not critical, but that rpm makes for a sweet hone pattern on the rotors:




After doing the "outsides" of the rotors, I removed the wheel and swapped sides (temporarily) and did the "insides" which were now outside.

Here's the result, before and after photos:





This effort totally eliminated a little chatter I had in a set of fairly new and very straight rotors. Light braking pressure is rewarded with the smoothest, most progressive feel you can imagine.

Of course as LDH said, glass-beading is great if you have it available, but.....it only cleans (perfectly). It doesn't provide that nice hone pattern.

And if you want to do this and NOT replace pads with lots of meat left on them, simply buff the pads on rough, clean concrete for a few seconds (really!) to get a new surface.

John, 2000 RC51 #000100

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post #9 of 9 (permalink) Old 12-28-2015, 01:55 PM
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If your rotors are merely in need of "glaze braking" and a general surface cleanup before installing new pads, you will find braking nirvana via the Medium (120 Grit) hone. Obviously, if you have a problem that needs the Coarse Grit....you need new rotors!
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