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  Topic Review (Newest First)
07-22-2015 03:04 PM
g34343greg I learned to ride on the mean streets of Pittsburgh (ok, they're not THAT crazy, but it's still a city) on a Ninja 250 years before I had a driver's license. Stupid State Farm didn't even believe that I could have a motorcycle license without a driver's license so I found out after a while that they never even added me to the policy!

But yeah, dirt riding is the way to go to get the fundamentals down.
06-25-2015 07:13 PM
The Stig Good to hear the dinner conversation sparked progress.

I recently bought a Honda CRM250R, so I can follow my daughter when she rides the CRF50 in the forests here. Wanna teach her in the way that I preach!

Our 3 year old son has also now learnt to ride a bicycle. He'll be on the CRM as soon as hit feet can reach the floor comfortably, no doubt.
06-25-2015 06:44 PM
arrozconpollo
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Stig View Post
As I learnt to ride bikes on dirt & sand, I always advocate the same as above.
I started on a 175 (It was too big for me at 13), then at 17 went onto a 250 enduro bike which I rode on & off road, then onto bigger things.

Usually around that time I share that it's very beneficial to learn off-road someone comes along and says they learnt on a 600 sportsbike, etc.
Who am I to wrong them? There's not much I can do except think - I wouldn't let my kid learn on a 600 sports bike. No way!!!

Like WeyrauchRC51, I bought a cheap CRF50 for my kids. My 6 year old daughter is just about able to control it herself now, with me riding on the back with her off-road (it's cramped, but fun). She still lacks confidence to ride on her own, but she's always been careful of dangerous things since before she could walk.
My son who is 3 is much less risk averse. He still can't quite ride a bicycle, but balances fine on a training bike without pedals and gets up to some big speeds on that.
On the CRF50 with me on the back, he drops his upper body hard into corners, just as he rides his training bike and makes me giggle.
They both love riding the CRF with me, especially the little guy. He gets really excited when I start the engine.

Once they're up to it I'll let them each ride on their own and as they grow up I intend they'll always have bikes to ride in the forest around our home, so that when they're adults if they ever decide they want to ride roads bikes they'll have been through all the lessons of bike control at slow speeds and be familiar with the consequences of not riding under control.

Rice & chicken (arrozconpollo), you obviously can't give your daughter and her friend a childhood of riding experiences now, but you can make sure they're proficient on bikes off-road first. Get lightweight off road bikes & protective gear, take them on rough terrain, they can fall off countless times, get scrapes, etc. that's fine. Just make sure it's a lot of fun for them, they'll learn best that way. They can also begin riding on these dual purpose bikes, on the road later...You could even make them into motards later so they really build confidence leaning a lightweight bike well over....

Riding off-road can also remain a fun way to continue to learn even after they decide they really want to move onto a sports bike. A transition like this will certainly be safer than going straight onto tarmac from the beginning.
she will take the course with my daughter I have been showing them the basics about positioning and the essentials but after I see them on the course I will get a better feel where they stand. thanks for all the great advice
06-16-2015 04:28 AM
Luckyadam12 1/2???? I barely remember what a dollar bill looks like!
The other... I do alright.
06-14-2015 07:20 PM
madbuyer
Quote:
Originally Posted by Luckyadam12 View Post
I would recommend getting them in a course first.
They take the course on a range bike. They may get out there and not want to ride.
I've had that (MSF Rider Coach). Couple times had people come out and really want to ride.
Once they get out there, they decide it's not for them.

I personally would start there. My wife wants to learn. I have a 71 CB750 in the garage that I've told her will be hers,... after she takes a course.
I also told her she would NEVER ride my RC51.
She said, "I will after I get my endorsement. I'll just ride it when you aren't home."
I reiterated the word 'NEVER'.
That's when I got a chocolate donut in the face!
Its that ratio thing Adam....1/2 the money and ALL of the vajayjay.
06-13-2015 02:19 PM
Hooch I always point people toward the Ninja 250 and 500 as well as the gs500 and blast 500. Then i make them sit in front of youtube and watch the whole
"Twist of the wrist II" video.
05-21-2015 07:42 PM
The Stig As I learnt to ride bikes on dirt & sand, I always advocate the same as above.
I started on a 175 (It was too big for me at 13), then at 17 went onto a 250 enduro bike which I rode on & off road, then onto bigger things.

Usually around that time I share that it's very beneficial to learn off-road someone comes along and says they learnt on a 600 sportsbike, etc.
Who am I to wrong them? There's not much I can do except think - I wouldn't let my kid learn on a 600 sports bike. No way!!!

Like WeyrauchRC51, I bought a cheap CRF50 for my kids. My 6 year old daughter is just about able to control it herself now, with me riding on the back with her off-road (it's cramped, but fun). She still lacks confidence to ride on her own, but she's always been careful of dangerous things since before she could walk.
My son who is 3 is much less risk averse. He still can't quite ride a bicycle, but balances fine on a training bike without pedals and gets up to some big speeds on that.
On the CRF50 with me on the back, he drops his upper body hard into corners, just as he rides his training bike and makes me giggle.
They both love riding the CRF with me, especially the little guy. He gets really excited when I start the engine.

Once they're up to it I'll let them each ride on their own and as they grow up I intend they'll always have bikes to ride in the forest around our home, so that when they're adults if they ever decide they want to ride roads bikes they'll have been through all the lessons of bike control at slow speeds and be familiar with the consequences of not riding under control.

Rice & chicken (arrozconpollo), you obviously can't give your daughter and her friend a childhood of riding experiences now, but you can make sure they're proficient on bikes off-road first. Get lightweight off road bikes & protective gear, take them on rough terrain, they can fall off countless times, get scrapes, etc. that's fine. Just make sure it's a lot of fun for them, they'll learn best that way. They can also begin riding on these dual purpose bikes, on the road later...You could even make them into motards later so they really build confidence leaning a lightweight bike well over....

Riding off-road can also remain a fun way to continue to learn even after they decide they really want to move onto a sports bike. A transition like this will certainly be safer than going straight onto tarmac from the beginning.
05-21-2015 04:14 PM
arrozconpollo
Quote:
Originally Posted by extrapolator View Post
A 70! OK, that may be a bit too small, but even a 70 will propel a 125 lb person well enough to learn on, and a 70 will be a physically small bike, and lighter, so easier to handle, easier to balance, not as far to fall to the ground etc. A 100 or 125 could also work, but the bike's overall size will be bigger, almost the size of a full sized bike. Depends on the size of the person learning to ride. If they're much over 5' tall, then a 100 or 125 will prob work. If shorter than that, a bike under a 100 is prob better.

Something I failed to mention in my original response is TIME: While riding a small dirt bike around on some grass for an hour is a start, it's a very small start. The longer you spend in the grass / dirt, the better. Days, weeks ... months, the longer the better. That may not be realistic, but it's true that experience in the dirt is the way to learn ... well, the best way to survive the learning process.

In the dirt, you learn what it feels like when the back tire is spinning and sliding, what it takes to make that happen. Same with wheelies. If you learn those things on the street, LOOK OUT!

Street bikes are big, heavy and FAST, and cars with idiot texting drivers are all around, and there's very little room for error like there is on a small dirt bike. Lessons on the street are usually painful at best.

All that said ... Good luck! (I feel like a damn parent after writing this! But it is all true)
Thank you for that great advice. as I will show them the basics and what not It will obviously take some time and through time comes experience.
05-21-2015 03:33 PM
extrapolator
Quote:
Originally Posted by arrozconpollo View Post
great! what type of dirt bike would you recommend?
A 70! OK, that may be a bit too small, but even a 70 will propel a 125 lb person well enough to learn on, and a 70 will be a physically small bike, and lighter, so easier to handle, easier to balance, not as far to fall to the ground etc. A 100 or 125 could also work, but the bike's overall size will be bigger, almost the size of a full sized bike. Depends on the size of the person learning to ride. If they're much over 5' tall, then a 100 or 125 will prob work. If shorter than that, a bike under a 100 is prob better.

Something I failed to mention in my original response is TIME: While riding a small dirt bike around on some grass for an hour is a start, it's a very small start. The longer you spend in the grass / dirt, the better. Days, weeks ... months, the longer the better. That may not be realistic, but it's true that experience in the dirt is the way to learn ... well, the best way to survive the learning process.

In the dirt, you learn what it feels like when the back tire is spinning and sliding, what it takes to make that happen. Same with wheelies. If you learn those things on the street, LOOK OUT!

Street bikes are big, heavy and FAST, and cars with idiot texting drivers are all around, and there's very little room for error like there is on a small dirt bike. Lessons on the street are usually painful at best.

All that said ... Good luck! (I feel like a damn parent after writing this! But it is all true)
05-21-2015 03:19 PM
Luckyadam12
Quote:
Originally Posted by LDH® View Post
Yes I do as long as they have the built in aptitude to ride properly. If they are scared of the bike and unsure of the controls etc you might as well be trying to teach a nerf football to play the guitar. If they are confident at the controls though they pay attention and strive to improve in a manner that puts most of the guys to shame even if they are technically of a less proficient skill level than the male riders.


In a related tangent to this very topic I recently took a female friend shooting. The last time she shot was about 16 years ago and she is planning on moving to San Diego by herself soon and wanted to learn how to shoot handguns properly for defense. I went through all the basics of handling the weapons and spent a lot of time working on her stance, but what gets my attention is simply how much better marksmen women tend to be over men. They exponentially improve. I mean women being a bit overwhelmed with information at first tend to initially forget the steps so being repetitive is the key, but with just a little interactive reminding along the way they do get it and become like robots before it is over in terms of procedure, grip & stance etc. I've noticed the same thing on the track when instructing women riders. If you can work with them one on one and get them to understand the building blocks of riding they become very proficient very quickly.

Many guys tend to get ego blocks where they won't drop their competitive nature long enough to admit they don't know something and pay attention to what we are trying to show them. They just want to go faster than they did the lap before and it doesn't matter if they do it right or not as long as it is faster. Women would rather be slower on the track, but be correct in their methods.
Good grief man! Nail on the head!!!!
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