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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
i have had to bikes with aluminum Marchesini wheels , there the best light and strong , plus if they get bent , you can have them fixed , unsprung weight is great with Marchesini wheels , rock , why dont i see any RC51 with them on ??? o and i have a 03 RC51 with stock 5 spoke wheels now , and i have to say im going to keep them fell great and are very light , i was just asking where are the marchesini at :) here are my old bikes with the wheels on
 

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Just a quick question on marchesini wheels and lighter wheels in general.

Along with the brake rotors and sprockets on the back wheel, what else does one have to swap off to fit Marchesini wheels?

Considering the weight of the bike, is a tiny reduction of weight really that noticeable? Like can the average joe feel the difference or does it take a pro at the track to really feel it.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
what i found out was at the track and around 90 mph ++ big difference , remember its not so much the total weight but where the weight is on the wheel , that makes unsprung , marchesini has most of the weight in the hub and very lite to outside edge , for every 8 lbs when moving is like 32 lbs , so even a 5 lb total loss is big , plus with lite wheels and sprockets and rotors , you get better stopping !! fast accelerating !! and turning back and fourth , i think in upgrading your bike there should be 1st suspension -- 2nd wheels ,brakes - 3rd lots of track days , LAST more power , only 2% of riders can out ride a stock bike power ,
 

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Just a quick question on marchesini wheels and lighter wheels in general.

Along with the brake rotors and sprockets on the back wheel, what else does one have to swap off to fit Marchesini wheels?

Considering the weight of the bike, is a tiny reduction of weight really that noticeable? Like can the average joe feel the difference or does it take a pro at the track to really feel it.
The Marchesini wheels for the RC51 use the same front and rear brake rotor bolt pattern, so you can swap over your OEM or aftermarket rotors with no problems.

The Marchesini wheels use sealed bearings with captive spacers (spacers that fit into the inner bearing race and are held in place) as opposed to the OEM wheels that use separate bearings and dust seals along with non-captive spacers (spacers that aren't held by the bearing races).

Also the Marchesini wheels use different bearings than those used by OEM wheels. This is not big deal as they use bearings commonly available from any bearing house.

The Marchesini wheels do use a different rear sprocket bolt pattern than OEM.
You will have to order rear sprockets that use a 5-bolt pattern with a 100mm bolt circle, and 76mm sprocket I.D.
These can be bought from Vortex, Renthal, Driven, and others.

The wheels are lighter than OEM wheels, especially at the rim, which is the most important area of weight loss.

Because wheels are really flywheels, the less weight at the rim, the less energy is required to overcome inertia to spin up (accelerating) or spin down (braking).
And since there is less weight at the rim (less gyroscopic force), the the bike turns much quicker.

Wheels made of magnesium are even lighter with even greater results, and BST carbon-fiber wheels have even larger results than magnesium.

None of these wheels are cheap.
Use to be the BST carbon wheels were much more expensive than even the magnesium Marchesini, but of late, the magnesium Marchesinis are almost at parity with the BST's (which have gone down slightly in price), so the performance advantage is with the BST at that price level.

Otherwise, the forged aluminum wheels are the way to go.
A bit less expensive, but still with a performance gain over OEM.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
best way to feel the difference would be put the axle bolt in the wheel , and hold the wheel out away from your body , have someone spin the wheel as fast as one can , then as the wheel is spinning move the wheel side to side , this way you can feel the unsprung weight , and if you have a stock wheel and a after market wheel should feel a difference , stock wheel will be hard to move back and fourth . and a marchesini would be a lot easier,, . i hope this make seance :rolleyes:
 

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best way to feel the difference would be put the axle bolt in the wheel , and hold the wheel out away from your body , have someone spin the wheel as fast as one can , then as the wheel is spinning move the wheel side to side , this way you can feel the unsprung weight , and if you have a stock wheel and a after market wheel should feel a difference , stock wheel will be hard to move back and fourth . and a marchesini would be a lot easier,, . i hope this make seance :rolleyes:
Yep. I remember learning about this in my physics class. It's been awhile but I remember doing the same experiment above with a bicycle wheel. We'd sit in an office chair and turn the wheel from side to side while it was spinning to make the chair we were sitting in rotate. Once the wheel got spinning fast enough, it became really difficult to tilt it side to side while standing.
Gotta love the simple physics at work here.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
this post is turning out to be a good one
 

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Lovely bike Subsailor - nice wheels too! :D

Some wheels don't need wheel balancing weights - those that are well balanced from new & don't need said weights are a good sign of quality.
 

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I like the March's, but decided to be original and get some forged aluminum OZ wheels, the front is a little lighter than the march's, but the rear is a little heavier since it uses the stock cush drive setup:

 

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Interesting they use the stock cush drive - means you can use standard fitment sprockets instead of having to get special sizing.

I chose PVM (German) and have been very happy with them.

There are lots of brands and designs, I wouldn't say one is necessarily the best as they're good for different uses, etc. For example magnesium's not recommended for high mileage uses. I wonder if the gel coat on carbon wheels will eventually turn milky as it does on car body panels if left outside exposed to UV?
 

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Interesting they use the stock cush drive - means you can use standard fitment sprockets instead of having to get special sizing.

I chose PVM (German) and have been very happy with them.

There are lots of brands and designs, I wouldn't say one is necessarily the best as they're good for different uses, etc. For example magnesium's not recommended for high mileage uses. I wonder if the gel coat on carbon wheels will eventually turn milky as it does on car body panels if left outside exposed to UV?
Yep, the whole stock unit off the stock wheel is used, even the rubber parts. Best part is that they are dirt cheap off eBay, so I can pick up a few extras and throw sprockets on there for easier gearing changes.

Yeah, I was very close to picking up a set of mags, but since my bike sees a decent amount of use on the street and in all weather, I decided against it. If I was racing, then it might be a better option.

I don't think Bst uses gel coat. I think it is just an automotive clear coat with uv inhibitors. I haven't seen any with yellowing or milky spots. For the money, they better last a while!
 

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I also wonder how tough the clear coating on BST is against chipping when fitting replacement tyres.
Probably easy to damage. Alloy wheels can be anodised, which is a much tougher coating.
Having said this, IF I ever get another bike I might go for Carbon wheels next time. :D
 

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Lovely bike Subsailor - nice wheels too! :D

Some wheels don't need wheel balancing weights - those that are well balanced from new & don't need said weights are a good sign of quality.
When I was in the tire/wheel industry a little while back, I learned that even though the wheels may be of good quality and perfectly balanced, not all tires are.
 

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Discussion Starter #18

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When I was in the tire/wheel industry a little while back, I learned that even though the wheels may be of good quality and perfectly balanced, not all tires are.
That's also true of course. We see that with car tyres we fit to customer's cars.
Some of the cheaper brands tend to need a lot more more balancing weights than the more expensive ones.

My PVM's have Bridgestone tyres. Bike shop I used said they didn't need any balancing when fitting. I think the tyre is supposed to be positioned relative to the valve, but not sure on this point as I don't fit myself.

They've never added balancing weights & I've never have had a problem with imbalance having gone through various subsequent tyres (No wobbles at resonant speeds, etc), so all good.
 

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I think I paid less for the PVM's but that was some years ago - through Harris in the UK.
INTL carriage can be expensive though...
 
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