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Discussion Starter #1
Hi all! I just picked up a 2002 from a friend but the bike needs a little work. Things like light rust, tip over damage, broken foot pegs/clutch arms... small easy replaceable things. My question is, I'd like to take this time over the upcoming winter to tear this bike down, within reason, and really bring it back. What areas of the bike would really benefit from being pulled apart, cleaned, and lubricated? What part of the bike will require special tools and should be avoided until tools obtained? What part of the bike are trouble areas that need special attention? That I you very much for the help.
 

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Welcome to the forum!
How many miles on it? There isn't too much unique about the maintenance as they are pretty bulletproof, but they do run hot so keeping the coolant system fresh is key.
Any older bike of questionable maintenance history I think should get at least the following:
Flush all fluids: Oil, brake, clutch, coolant. Depending on your local climate I may also consider a coolant additive such as Water Wetter or Engine Ice. Any quality dot 4 brake fluid for the brakes and clutch will do.
Make sure the steering head bearings are greased and properly adjusted.
Same goes for the swingarm, but probably more trouble than its worth unless you are dealing with a truly high mileage bike. Special tools needed.
Tires! Even if they look like they have plenty of rubber left check the date code on them as they lose flexibility and traction over time.
Make sure chain and sprockets are within service limits, and the chain is properly lubed.
Since there is some minor rust as you say, it may be worth lubing your throttle cables while your at it. Motion pro has a widget.
One or 2 of the drain tubes that are routed down the left side of the motor have caps. Remove the caps, drain and replace.
The sprocket cover usually contains a bunch of crud...
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thank you very much. Great advise and insight. The bike is at 19k which isn't terrible. It also just went through a full service, new chain, f/r sprockets (16/40). The bike will be used in the desert and at about 4,200 ft elevation.
 

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It was due for a valve clearance check at 16,000 miles. Good idea to follow thru with it.

Change fork oil too.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Will look into that. Thanks ???. Looking through other posts, doesn't seem too bad doing it yourself.
 

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If you're greasing the steering head bearings, might as well switch to ALL BALLS (brand name) Timken bearings instead of the OEM ball type.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Rccbrz, took your advise on the All Balls bearings. Is there a trick to getting the bottom bearing in place without a press? Or am I better off paying a shop to press it into place?
 

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you need some type of hydrauliuc press.....you could freeze the stem and lightly heat the bearing and see if that and a rubber hammer works......
 

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Probably cheaper to have shop do it if they have competent techs. You can do it yourself with the Motion Pro kit but it will set ya back $143. Does fit a variety of bearing sizes and I can say it does work having used it for my bike. Whoa, my mistake! Saw the Tusk tool on amazon for $54 and realized that is the tool I own and used for my bearing replacement. 2 hits with 32oz hammer and done.
 

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you need some type of hydrauliuc press.....you could freeze the stem and lightly heat the bearing and see if that and a rubber hammer works......
I think you'd want to do that the other way. Freeze the bearing/race, and use a heat gun to warm the steering stem. ;)

11/16 Edit: Disregard my comment to rccbrz post. I'm wrong in this instance. Sorry.
 

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I always through bearings in the freezer for a couple of hours before installing, It's an old trick that works very well in most cases.
 

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I believe he's talking about the bearing/race that goes on the steering stem at the lower triple. That would require a bearing at room temp and the triple cooled off. The 2 races that go in the frame should be cooled for easier install.
 

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In my experience, the cooling/heating thing isn't necessary. The diameters of these small items (including all sorts of press-fit bearings on all sorts of cars and bikes) change very little from room temps to freezer temps, etc. After all, you can DISASSEMBLE these things at room temperature, right?

Proper installation techniques negate the need to warm or chill, but it certainly doesn't HURT.........unless you get it ass-backwards! :surprise:
 
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I think Denver Larry covered most of the things.

When I get a new bike I usually change the oil first, clean and lube the chain, depending on mileage i'll change the spark plugs as well.

Brake fluid you can tell is bad just by looking at it, if it's dark replace it. If it looks decent then just leave it alone imo. If you do replace the fluid then you should consider getting braided lines... better durability and performance. Plus they look awesome.
 

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I think you'd want to do that the other way. Freeze the bearing/race, and use a heat gun to warm the steering stem. ;)
Yes, it looks like I was wrong here. I was thinking of putting the bearing inside the frame neck, then sliding the steering tube into.... nevermind. brainfart

I believe he's talking about the bearing/race that goes on the steering stem at the lower triple. That would require a bearing at room temp and the triple cooled off. The 2 races that go in the frame should be cooled for easier install.
Yes, this is right. :eek:
 
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