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Discussion Starter #1
My front brakes are dragging more than they have been in the past since putting on ss lines last weekend. They are bled good, lever is nice and firm, I cleaned the pistons the other day, and the forks are aligned from the last time I has the wheel off. They're not terrible, but it's more than it was. I can hear them while riding.

Any ideas?
 

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My front brakes are dragging more than they have been in the past since putting on ss lines last weekend. They are bled good, lever is nice and firm, I cleaned the pistons the other day, and the forks are aligned from the last time I has the wheel off. They're not terrible, but it's more than it was. I can hear them while riding.

Any ideas?
Cleaned the buttons on the discs? could be the rotors not fully floating if the buttons are sticky/corroded
 

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Sorry, what buttons are we talking about?
On your front discs you have round "buttons" holding the braking portion of the disc to the carrier mounted to the wheel hub, these buttons allow the disc to "float" from side to side depending on which pads pushes on it first, if these buttons aren't free/clean then you can get feelings like warped disc or just not great feeling brakes

 

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If it turns out not to be the buttons...

When you cleaned your pistons, did you check for corrosion behind the seals inside the caliper? It's usually a good idea to use a brass brush & a dremmel to clean these recesses when cleaning up brakes. Build-up there can be the cause of pistons binding.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
They were moving pretty freely before cleaning them, but we're a little grimey, so I pumped them out a bit and got at them with a toothbrush and a little kerosene, rinsed them off with water, and air dried the caliper/pistons with a compressor
 

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If the bike has been standing a long time in it's past, or often used in rain, etc. with brake fluid being hydroscopic, moisture gets inside the calipers and around the seals is the first place water finds contact with fluid.

I learnt this trick when bringing an old but very low mileage bike back to life as it worked a treat. Might still be worth dis-assembling the calipers (use compressed air to carefully push the pistons out to make sure they don't go flying!) if you can't find any other causes.

I'd check the brake master cylinder too & make sure the lever's pivots are well cleaned & lubricated, in case there's gunk and grime there. Brakes need careful maintenance to work at their best.
 
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