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I have a lot of respect for Makis, he definately knows his way around these bikes. But I think you need to take into account the history of the bike. What kind of service has the clutch had so far? If you're uncertain, then disassemble and inspect closely.
I didn't know the history of the first 15,000 miles of my bike, and come to find out, I needed all new rubber, cause of a couple years of water contamination in the fluid, it had turned into a gooey peanut butter in the bottom of the slave cylinder. You cant flush that out, cause it sits on the bottom and the bleeder is at the top.
I suggest the following, (having just done it last summer) a master kit, which will include some cups, a seal for the push piston, and a new main piston. It's part #3 in this diagram. For the slave you should only need parts 13,9 & 6 from this diagram.

Inspect the collapsable diaphram in the master cylinder's resevior, I needed to replace that in my bike. I couldn't even tell untill I held it next to the new one, and saw a dramatic difference.
 

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I have a lot of respect for Makis, he definately knows his way around these bikes. But I think you need to take into account the history of the bike. What kind of service has the clutch had so far? If you're uncertain, then disassemble and inspect closely.
I didn't know the history of the first 15,000 miles of my bike, and come to find out, I needed all new rubber, cause of a couple years of water contamination in the fluid, it had turned into a gooey peanut butter in the bottom of the slave cylinder. You cant flush that out, cause it sits on the bottom and the bleeder is at the top.
I suggest the following, (having just done it last summer) a master kit, which will include some cups, a seal for the push piston, and a new main piston. It's part #3 in this diagram. For the slave you should only need parts 13,9 & 6 from this diagram.

Inspect the collapsable diaphram in the master cylinder's resevior, I needed to replace that in my bike. I couldn't even tell untill I held it next to the new one, and saw a dramatic difference.
Totally agree with you jondog on that.
The history of the bike is what's most important.
I just stated above that the rubbers don't wear out so easy.
However, if I din't know the history of my bike or if I have found out that it was poorly maintained from the previous owner, I wouldn't think twice on renewing the rubbers and fluids in crucial parts like the clutch, calipers, master cylinders, TB boots etc....

I am sorry if I wasn't so clear about it before.....didn't mean to mislead you.
 

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I have a lot of respect for Makis, he definately knows his way around these bikes. But I think you need to take into account the history of the bike. What kind of service has the clutch had so far? If you're uncertain, then disassemble and inspect closely.
I didn't know the history of the first 15,000 miles of my bike, and come to find out, I needed all new rubber, cause of a couple years of water contamination in the fluid, it had turned into a gooey peanut butter in the bottom of the slave cylinder. You cant flush that out, cause it sits on the bottom and the bleeder is at the top.
I suggest the following, (having just done it last summer) a master kit, which will include some cups, a seal for the push piston, and a new main piston. It's part #3 in this diagram. For the slave you should only need parts 13,9 & 6 from this diagram.

Inspect the collapsable diaphram in the master cylinder's resevior, I needed to replace that in my bike. I couldn't even tell untill I held it next to the new one, and saw a dramatic difference.
There is an old joke in there somewhere???:D

Good advice from jd and Makis....ask jd about the blue brake fluid next:eek:;):D
 

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There is an old joke in there somewhere???:D

Good advice from jd and Makis....ask jd about the blue brake fluid next:eek:;):D
You had to go bring that up! :mad: :D :p

Yes, I did use the WRONG clutch fluid because I was lazy and just asked the clerk at the store, and didn't check if he was right.
Lesson: consult the manual whenever possible when doing something new on a new to me bike!

Use only DOT 4 brake fluid for the hydralic clutch in our RC51's.
DO NOT use DOT 5. It's silicone, has no water absorbsion, and therefore no wet boiling point. If you feel you have to go one better than DOT4, I believe DOT 5.1 is suitable, but I'm not sure.
 

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You had to go bring that up! :mad: :D :p

Yes, I did use the WRONG clutch fluid because I was lazy and just asked the clerk at the store, and didn't check if he was right.
Lesson: consult the manual whenever possible when doing something new on a new to me bike!

Use only DOT 4 brake fluid for the hydralic clutch in our RC51's.
DO NOT use DOT 5. It's silicone, has no water absorbsion, and therefore no wet boiling point. If you feel you have to go one better than DOT4, I believe DOT 5.1 is suitable, but I'm not sure.
But it was cool looking in your resevoir, right? :D
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Jondog9 the clutch slave web link was not there, i google search and i cant find the part number. Is it in the clutch group? Thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Just finish doing the clutch master and slave, bleed master banjo bolt, slave banjo bolt and final thru nipple. Everything went well except the shipping of parts which is a bit high for 10 days. Now for the test ride, it seems to be jumpy on first gear. I'll bleed the fluid some more by tomorrow. I also notice some air in the resevoir. Thanks everybody great help.:)
 

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Since the banjo bolt on the Master is the highest point of the system, That's a likely place for that final bit of air. I'd bleed that once more.
 

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Master cylinder first (use a rug around it not to drip on your paint):
1) Loosen up the bolt 1/4 of a turn
2) Pull lever all the way
3) Tighten the bolt
4) Release the lever
5) Repeat

Do that 3-4 times until no air is coming out from the banjo bolt.

Slave cylinder:
Do the same procedure to the slave's banjo bolt a couple of times to make sure that no air is coming out of it.
Then go to the bleeding nipple and repeat the procedure 3-4 times.
If anything is like it supposed to be, you should be finished after that....then you tight everything up to the specified torque
 
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