RC51 Forums banner

1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
my biggest issue right now with reviving an 02 that's been on a 3 year hiatus is getting rid of the 3 year old gas that's full to the fill cap.

What's your recommendation on how to remove the fuel? I have already ordered 2 washers for the fuel line that connects to the tank, if I have to remove the tank. I am under the assumption that the fuel pump is in the tank and that the fuel will not rush out the bottom of the tank once the fuel line is removed.

Of course I could be wrong.

Another option i've though of is modding a fish tank water circulator to pump out the fuel, since I don't want to turn the tank upside-down.

I've also thought that if the fuel does not rush out when the tank is removed that I could connect 12V to the fuel pump and just have it pump the bad fuel out.

Any recommendations?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,663 Posts
Ditching 3 year old gas: good idea. :D
I've switched tanks a few times, I think the easiest way is to just lift the tank, siphon out the gas, then unhook the banjo bolt. Have a rag underneath, but there should be very little spill.

If you don't drain the tank, you will get massive amounts of gasoline coming out when you break that connection. :)

Dont use your fuel pump to pump out bad gas. Bad idea. :cool:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Should the fuel pour out the bottom if there is a fuel pump in the tank? I though that the pump would stop the flow if there's no voltage.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,663 Posts
I was thinking since you have old gas, you'd be taking the tank off. How far do you want to go - tank off and proper cleaning, or just get all the gas out?
I'd buy a new fuel pump gasket, ($10), take the fuel pump assembly off the bottom of the tank, inspect and clean, and put it back together. Your fpr might be ok for a while, but after 3 years of sitting it might not last long.

Don't run that old gas thru your fuel pump.
I think a fish tank pump would fail pretty quick Lol :D

If you unhook the bango bolt fitting, or the return line, gas will drain out unless you've emptied the tank first.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
First off, this isn't my bike. It's my brother's. He's pretty much lazy with self-initiative, so looks like i'll be doing all the work and head scratching. I prefer to do things the thorough and proper way. I don't like short-cuts with my toys, but this is my brother's bike.

Messing with the tank isn't a huge task, so I'll just see if the current pump will work. If it fails later, it's his problem.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,663 Posts
3 year old gas isn't gas anymore. It's freaking varnish. Do what you want. The fuel pumps are not rebuildable. Fuel pumps cost in excess of $150. Fuel filters cost around $45. Who's gonna repair it if it fails or plugs up? Your brother, or you? I don't understand why you want to use the bike's pump when a siphon hose is so incredibly easy and obvious. :confused:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Well we were able to suck out over 4 gallons using an old mityvac I had. It took a long time. Filled up the tank with new premium and the bike fired up. We're having idle issues, but it runs fine if you keep it rev'ed above 2k. Riding it, it's fine. Coming to a stop, and the bike cuts out. I can't turn the idle adjuster clockwise anymore.

We're having no luck with setting the idle, thermostat at 180 degrees.

Any thoughts?
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,335 Posts
Remove the air box and spray the carbs down. (You might be able to see if anything was living in the air box too.) This would be a good time to check the fuel pressure regulator.

I'd buy a pint of Seafoam too and dump it in this tank and run the piss out of it.:cool:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
Remove the air box and spray the carbs down. (You might be able to see if anything was living in the air box too.) This would be a good time to check the fuel pressure regulator.

I'd buy a pint of Seafoam too and dump it in this tank and run the piss out of it.:cool:
A friend of ours suggested the seafoam method and also mentioned fuel injector cleaner. I wasn't familiar with seafoam until I watched some videos about it.

All that really came to my mind is that this bad stuff needed to vacate the bike and hopefully if any of it gummed up that running fresh gas might thin it out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,186 Posts
WTF is with carb suggestions? The RC51 is FI. I would suggest using FI cleaner, not carb cleaner, as the RC51 is FI.

Well we were able to suck out over 4 gallons using an old mityvac I had. It took a long time. Filled up the tank with new premium and the bike fired up. We're having idle issues, but it runs fine if you keep it rev'ed above 2k. Riding it, it's fine. Coming to a stop, and the bike cuts out. I can't turn the idle adjuster clockwise anymore.

We're having no luck with setting the idle, thermostat at 180 degrees.

Any thoughts?
This stuff is relatively simple, but shortcuts mean you may have to redo stuff.

1. drain the tank with a gravity or vac system.

1b. In your case, unbolt and pop the tank up to get access underneath.

1c. In your case, once you can access the idle adjustment, fix whatever is seized or broken on that adjustment cable. Get it working and adjust to 1300 rpm idle as per the manual.

1d. I suggest pulling the tank completely off and draining it completely, with basic disassembly. Gets rid of old gas and members have previously posted that the fuel pump has gummed up with old gas. This is your chance to identify and fix. (since it is doing high rpm well, you probably are okay here)

2. Add fresh premium gas. Add fuel injector cleaner (to the recommended amount , concentration wise).

3. Run the bike and it will clear and fix things up, unless 1c or 1d are issues which you did not yet address.

Hope it helps.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,335 Posts
Excuse me....throttle bodies, not carbs. Some people use this term interchangeably while working with both. Simply put, thanks for your technical correction kwtoxman:rolleyes:

I spray my carbs and throttle bodies routinely with cleaners as needed with no issues.

Just keep us posted OP, I hope you fix your issues soon.:cool:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,186 Posts
Excuse me....throttle bodies, not carbs. Some people use this term interchangeably while working with both. Simply put, thanks for your technical correction kwtoxman:rolleyes:
Hey, I'm not putting you down. Relax, we're all friends here. The thing I don't know is if carb cleaner is compatible with FI. It may be much more caustic, on top of company formulation differences (e.g., one may be more compatible, one may be much less so). I'm just trying to err on the side of caution. I've seen some crazy rubber FI system degradation posted on this forum just with old gas. I would humbly suggest just being cautious on chemicals used. IE, just to be safe, stay with FI cleaner on the RC51, don't use carb cleaner.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
I'm well aware of the two cleaners, carb cleaner and FI cleaner. I don't interchange them. I have already pumped 4.XX gallons of fuel out to the best I can without removing the pump assembly from the tank while the tank was propped up.

I will try the injector cleaner (amount added with respect to amount of fuel) and hope that a full run tank will clear things out and that it will idle properly. Seafoam will be my option if the FI cleaner doesn't clear things up.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,335 Posts
Hey, I'm not putting you down. Relax, we're all friends here. The thing I don't know is if carb cleaner is compatible with FI. It may be much more caustic, on top of company formulation differences (e.g., one may be more compatible, one may be much less so). I'm just trying to err on the side of caution. I've seen some crazy rubber FI system degradation posted on this forum just with old gas. I would humbly suggest just being cautious on chemicals used.
I am quite relaxed actually. I feel like I am at work with the techno nuts when I read your post.:rolleyes: Would it drive you nuts if I called it a valve? That's what I call them at work around some of those guys and it drives them ape shyt.:D

As someone who has been involved in the process of manufacturing carbs, throttle bodies and fuel injectors for close to 24 years, I am not going to steer to anything I haven't used before in those manufacturing processes with success. Carb cleaner is routinely used off line in the production as it an excellent varnish or MO paint remover. (We also use Perchloroethylene also known as Tetrachloroethylene. These dry relatively quickly with no residue but most common folks do not have access to this! EPA issues!) Carb cleaner is the ticket when in a pinch. (Just remember to keep your body plastics away from any of this stuff!)

Yes, some rubber, usually natural rubber, doesn't like these chemicals which is why the Japanese go overkill on the use of viton or gasoline friendly compounds in these areas.


As for cleaning the injectors, I find the "fuel injection cleaners" are something sold to make people feel better. It may help remove some crap from your tank and maybe your fuel rail/ plumbing but the injector itself, no. (Pending on how bad the situations I have seen fuel injection cleaners cause the injector to become clogged. The tolerances we deal with in the manufacturing process injectors these days are almost the molecular structure of the gasoline itself. If it wasn't illegal for me to show you, I'd love to share some drawings of the new generation fuel injectors. I find the best way to clean injectors is with the ultrasonic process. Its very thorough and less risk of contamination from something up stream.

Rubber degradation, nothing will stop this, fuel is just nasty shyt. Might be best to replace some of the critical sealing points just to avoid fires. (Not being a fear monger, just realistic)
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
6,481 Posts
I pulled the fuel return line from the fuel pressure regulator at then end of the throttle body and pointed the hose end into a portable plastic fuel container.

It takes a while due to the small hose diameter, but it drains the level down enough that the fuel tank can be tilted forward and away from the fuel pump after the hinge pin and front mount bolts are removed.

Then the main fuel supply line banjo bolt can be loosened and the fuel tank removed.
After that, most of remaining fuel can be drained into a catch pan and dumped into the waste fuel container.
 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
Top