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Hi
I have had my SP1 parked up for a few years and although it was run out of petrol before being parked I cannot get it to start now. Is there an easy way to clean out the fuel system on these bikes as I am assuming that is the problem.
 

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Hi
I have had my SP1 parked up for a few years and although it was run out of petrol before being parked I cannot get it to start now. Is there an easy way to clean out the fuel system on these bikes as I am assuming that is the problem.
You gotta give a little more than that.
Does it fire?
Does the fuel pump prime?
Did anyone try to fire it with the old fuel still in it?
A likely reason it wont start, is part or all of your fuel system is gummed up.
Another big mistake is trying to start on an old battery that's been inactive for that long, then recharged. It may show the proper voltage on a meter, at least 12.75 or better, until you thumb the start button. If voltage drops below 11 or so, ECU wont function.

Sitting that long, with the ethanol in the gas these days, no doubt your injectors and fpr need attention. I would suspect the fuel filter too. Hopefully the fuel pump isn't gummed up.
Rust in the gas tank is a possibility.
And the SP1's were prone to a faulty weld that causes rust and leaking. At the rear tank bracket. Look for discoloration in the red paint at the hinge.

All that said, the easy way is to purge all the old fuel from the system, get fresh fuel, and a bottle of Seafoam. I haven't ever used it, but it gets good remarks on the forums.
Sometimes...
 

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What does the inside of the tank look like? Pics?
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Starting problems

Hi, in answer to your questions, no it does not attempt to fire at all although dropping a little petrol down the carb bodies and it does attempt to fire. The bike was let run dry when parked up but I guess it will never totally clear the system. It was turned over now and again when parked up so have taken in any dead fuel. The fuel pump is priming and has been flushed out with fresh petrol. I have not went any deeper as it looks quite a complicated stripping job to get into the fuel system and I have not been able to find any advise on removing the air box etc to investigate further. Any help would be greatly appreciated.
Many thanks
Owltimer
 

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Just to get it started? I don't know, but I doubt it. Carb cleaner is really corrosive to some materials. especially any gaskets or rubber seals.
If the injectors are clogged, take them out and have a shop ultrasonic clean them.
I've never been that far into my fuel system personally. But after doing a complete rebuild on my gl1000 carbs, I learned how risky carb cleaner can be.
Hopefully some members more experienced will chime in, but the service manual is also a wealth of information.

does it have a power commander?
Ah, good point.
If so, bypass it temporarily, and continue troubleshooting.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Hi
Once again thanks for the info, i have been into the injectors/fuel lines etc and they all seem pretty clean but still no success.
In answer to your other question yes it does have a power commander (came fitted to the bike when I purchased it). I know nothing about them or what it entails bypassing them, will have a look at it tomorrow as I don't know what else to try now.
Cheers
 

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With fuel tank raised, you'll find the 2 harness connectors on the left inside of the frame, near the rear of the fuel tank. Figure out which are the male and female plugs of the OEM harness and reconnect them, and just tuck the PC's unplugged connectors to the side. Be careful if you lower the tank for testing, there's not much room and wires can get pinched or chaffed.

You can go to Dynojet's website to find out more about the PC version you have. Installation instructions and such, and downloadable maps.
 

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You can go to Dynojet's website to find out more about the PC version you have. Installation instructions and such, and downloadable maps.
Maybe also hook your PC up to the Power Commander to check the map since the bike has been sitting idle.

Once you get it started with fresh fuel, then add Seafoam.

Seafoam works well, add a can to a just less than full tank, run it through the system.
 

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This sounds exactly like what just happened to me.
I put the extra lead from the power commander to the Positive side of my battery, thinking the power commander was grounded back there.

Once I figgered out to try it on the negative side, she fired up right away.




Yes there is a power commander fitted.
 

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When you said the injectors 'seemed ok', it's hard to tell unless you bench flow them. If in doubt, have them sonic cleaned.
It really sounds to me like you're going to have to go thru each of the fuel system's components.
fuel tank
fuel pump
fuel filter
fuel pressure regulator
all related hoses
(Use new crush washers for final assembly of fuel fittings. One on each side of the banjo fitting and torque to proper spec)

Are you sure it fired when you poured a little fuel in?
Try a small blast of starting fluid.
If it will run for a brief second or two, that indicates that all the sensors that affect start-up are working properly, (the kill switch, bank angle sensor and relay, neutral switch, clutch handle switch, kickstand switch)

If your highbeam relay operates the highbeams properly, you can swap the high beam relay into the fuel pump relay just in case it's cutting out. Then you eliminate that possibility.

Check your spark plugs. Or just replace them with new iridium plugs (that's what should be in there now)
Pull both plugs out, test each one plugged into it's Plug Wire, hold the plug with a pair of insulated pliers, and touch the base of the plug to a sound ground point on the bike. Is the spark blue or yellow? A spark tester from the auto store will work better and more accurate to gauge spark color.
Blue means a strong spark, yellow or orange means weak spark.
A weak spark can be caused by the coils, (or old plugs), in which case, it's back to the service manual for troubleshooting.
I'd do a compression test just for good measure while you have both plugs out.

Honda Service Manual is your best friend right now. :wink2:
 
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