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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I havent been 100% happy with the suspension set up on the bike even though it still handles pretty damn good. I think I have some work to do on the rear shock cause it hunkers down a lot with strong throttle and can wallow sometimes in the turns. Anyway, preload on the front forks is usually the large nut, but what if anything is the black plastic nut on each fork that has the arrows on it? I think its a 14mm or so going by what my memory is guessing at work. Rebound is the slot in the middle, and compression is on the bottom leg. What else is there?

Hoping Subsailor will chime in :D
 

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For SP2's, the black metal nut at the top of each fork is the pre-load adjuster.
The large blue nut is the fork cap nut. Don't remove that.
The small slotted adjuster at top is for rebound.
The black knob at the lower part of the forks is the compression.
As with all the adjusters, don't use excessive force or damage will occur.
Gently turn all adjusters to their settings.

For SP1's, the preload adjuster is a smaller aluminum nut with notches to indicate how many millimeters of preload. The SP2's adjuster just rotates with no visual cue.
You'll need to count the number of turns to match the other.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Once again, many thanks. Ill put down my old and new figures next week after I start fiddling.
 

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ok, i need to revive this for a second. If i turn the black knob on my SP2, lets say all the way counterclockwise (hoping to reach the least amount of preload)......there is a stopping point correct? I mean its not just going to spin itself out of some seat and send shock oil spewing everywhere correct? (sorry, im pretty newb-ish when it comes to front forks)

The reason i ask this is b/c i spun it earlier and it turned no problem, but that black part underneath it also turned (is that supposed to happen?)
 

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Assuming you're talking about the bottom of the fork legs, that's the compression. If you turn it all the way clockwise, that's it's stiffest setting, and the starting starting point. That's all the way closed. You should have practicality no movement from your forks. If you were to rotate it counterclockwise to full open, you will have ridiculously easy movement.

So with compression, I start at full closed, and my particular setting is 8 clicks out.
Same with the rebound, and mine happens to be 9 clicks out.
The preload wont click, so you start full closed and count the full 360 degree rotations out. Mine is set at 1 turn out.

There is a stopping point at full open for the compression and rebound settings. It shouldn't spin endlessly. I think my SP1 has about 40 some clicks of adjustment between full open and full closed, but can't remember for sure...

Just in case you haven't checked your riders sag lately, LDH suggests these settings.
Forks: 38-40mm of Rider Sag
Rear Shock: 25-30 mm of Rider Sag (I tend to prefer the 25mm which is more towards race numbers even for street use)
This should be done before trying to get your compression and rebound settings dialed in.

http://www.rc51.org/susp.htm
 

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ok, i need to revive this for a second. If i turn the black knob on my SP2, lets say all the way counterclockwise (hoping to reach the least amount of preload)......there is a stopping point correct? I mean its not just going to spin itself out of some seat and send shock oil spewing everywhere correct? (sorry, im pretty newb-ish when it comes to front forks)

The reason i ask this is b/c i spun it earlier and it turned no problem, but that black part underneath it also turned (is that supposed to happen?)
The spring preload adjusters will stop at their upper and lower ranges.
The SP2 preload adjuster is internal to the fork cap, and is rotated by the adjust case, which has flats at its tip onto which the black hex adjust nut slips over and held by a retainer clip.

If too much force is used, the black hex nut could potentially round itself or the adjust case flats off.

The compression adjustment knobs have detectable clicks when rotated.
The rebound adjusters do not have clicks, so one must visually note the amount each adjuster is rotated out from their full inward stop to match positions.

Use finger pressure when rotating the rebound adjusters.
They are brass needle valves and can easily be damaged if excessive force is used, especially when rotating full inwards top (clockwise).
 
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