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To all you Veteran's past and future. I want to thank you for your service.
 

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Ditto!
Here's to all the men and women who've served to protect our great country.
 

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lol ^^^ nice job, 8 years was all I could handle
 

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A salute to my underseas brethren, past, present, and future.

And a salute to those who came before us, and to those on eternal patrol, watching over us while we sail beneath the waves.

 

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^^^
You too man!!!
and agree with you on that.
Sad picture
 

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For the unknowing...is that a pic of an up/down thingy ("elevator" in airplane-speak) like this?



Either way, whats the story on it?
 

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Those are called farewater planes..
It assists the submarine in going up and down in elevation. Then there are sternplanes on the aft end that allows the submarine to take angles.
Some submarine's have farewater planes, some have bowplanes. The farewater planes are located on the sail (the part that sticks up on the top), while the bowplanes are on the hull (the big round part).
 

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Either way, whats the story on it?
USS Scorpon, SSN 589. Lost near the Azores May 27, 1968.
Officially, it was lost due to a torpedo malfunction.

Unofficially, it was reportedly sunk by the Soviet Union as retribution for the perceived US sinking of Soviet submarine K-129 in April 1968.

The K-129 was what the CIA was after when it developed the Glomar Explorer to retrieve the ship.

The Walker Gang provided Top-Secret comm intel that allowed the Soviets to track the whereabouts of US submarines for several years.

Supposedly, this allowed the Soviets to know where to locate the Scorpion and position an attack boat in position for the attack.

Last photo of the Scorpion before she was reported lost.



Bow section



The oval opening is where a rescue buoy was originally stored.
The opening to the left is the torpedo loading hatch, that has been blown off and missing.
The round opening to the left of that is the torpedo room escape trunk hatch, also blown off from the forces that destroyed the ship.
This section has been blown off from the rest of the ship.

Stern/Engine Room section



The aft section of the ship is laying on its side.
The upper portion of the rudder is the fin at the lower portion of the photo, where you can still make out the draft marks painted on its surface.

The stern planes are the fins sticking up in this orientation. They controlled the pitch of the ship while underwater, like the elevators on an airplane.

The reason for the odd waffle pattern is due to the force of water pressure crushing steel skin into the stiffening braces internally.
The "skin" of those planes and superstructure is about 1/2" thick.
Crushed like a beer can.

To the right, you'll notice an arcing line dividing the two sections.
What you don't see is a smaller diameter section that joined the engine room to the auxiliary compartment. The aft main ballast tanks surrounded that area.
The reason you don't see it is, the force of the ocean eventually sheared the welds and telescoped the engine room into the auxiliary compartment.
The adjoining section is inside the section to the right.

To the left, what's missing is the ships screw (propeller) and shaft, which were ejected when the two compartments telescoped together on collapse.

The important take away from this is...
The bow section was blown apart from the ship and instantly flooded, killing all inside instantly from sea pressure.

The engine room did not immediately collapse, indicating it was still intact and water tight after the ship broke apart and sank.

The men in that compartment were still alive as it continued to sink, leaving them to hear and see the 2" thick high-tensile steel hull bend, bulge, groan, and then scream from the increasing pressure before the welds eventually let go.
Once that happened, the force of thousands of tons of water pressure instantly vaporized them in about .02 seconds from 3000 deg F air compressed by the water.
If you want to know what it's like being inside an diesel engine, they knew, but only instantly.

That's why there no remains.
 
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