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Discussion Starter #1
i jut drained the fluid in my clutch line, refilled the cup, and followed the manual to a "T". i am getting no pressure in at the lever, but i am moving fluid through the line because when i stop pumping and bleed the line, i get about 3 inches or fluid up my drainage hose that i attached. The fluid is clear, no bubbles, but i am not getting any pressure at the lever no matter how slow or fast i pump. i amt:
filling the master when necessary
pumping
holding the lever engaged
releasing the bleeder valve
ejecting some fluid
tightening bleeder valve
restart process

points to note: i just replaced my clutch, sprckets and chain...all of which are very close to the clutch slave cylinder...could i have blow something up? any help you all have would be awesome as i am stuck on ome nice days looking at an RC51 stripped in my shed....
 

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Anybody squeeze the clutch lever while the cover was off while changing sprockets?
Any fluid leaks around the cover?
If all the air was bleed from the lines, you should be getting some resistance.
 

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Do you have the washers on both sides of all banjo bolts? Sometimes you need to replace those. I think they're like a crush washer, you can only use them once or twice-technically.
If you cant see any leaks, and you still cant get a little pressure on your handle, you might still have air in the elbow at your resevior.
That's the highest point of the system, and I had air there. I carefully bled that banjo bolt exactly like you are already doing.
Make sure you let the handle out SLOWLY. a second or two. It takes a moment for the resevior cup to let go of the fluid to replace all that you just released from the bleeder valve.
Hope that helps
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Yes. Some idiot (read: "me") did squeeze the lever while the front cover ws off. Believe it or not the first squeeze was my shirt getting caught but the next one was to see how the the thing works. I figured since I was draining and refilling with new fluid that I would have to bleed it anyway.

And nope...I can't see any leaks,cracks or air bubbles in any lines or what I am pumping out. When u pump the lever, maybe I am not holding it in or letting it catch up enough. I just figured if there was still air in there that t least I would see SOME sort of bubble. I was wondering if maybe a rebuild kit would help.

If the shaft that connects to the piston on the actual clutch plates were sticking out on the chain side more, could I have blown something by screwing the cover back on chain side and essentially pressing the shaft against the slave piston and the clutch basket piston?
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Because i know you have all been PATIENTLY waiting to see how i made out, its all better now. from trolling the other threads of people with the same issue, i started seeing people who were bleeding the clutch line from the top banjo bolt. I figured why not give it a shot. I wrapped the master cylinder and that part of the line in a towel, threw on the 12mm wrench, pumped about three times and held it, released the banjo nut, and bam! you could literally here a "pfffffft" as all the air was bled out of that part of the system. close up the nut, and I instantly had lever pressure. i ran one more cup of fluid through the system for safety and took her out for a beat run.

so now, i have a smooth clutch pull, new clutch plates, clutch discs, and clutch springs, and i have finally seen some scary power out of this bike. I had no idea how much power i was actually losing when i was slipping at around 8000 rpm.

thanks for all the help guys, this forum has saved me TONS of money (and then caused me to blow those savings on parts).
 

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Yea, that banjo bolt at the elbow is the highest point of the system. Naturally, air will want to go there.
Glad you got it worked out.
we love scary power!!!
 

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clutch bleeding

I had black clutch fluid and changed it out but lost all lever pressure. Glad I saw your discussion. I had been getting v little through Motion Pro 08-0143 Bleeder (I identify it because it's cheap and it worked on brakes; I had no problem!) I did the banjo bolt thing. Instant lever. Ran some more fluid through bleeder. Fixed. Thanks (I cancelled an order for a power bleeder and saved $$.)
 

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Same idea works on brakes too, but always leave the reservoir cap loose so air can get in there and make sure your fluid level doesn't go too low.
Wrap a towel around and you don't have to overtighten the bolt while you are building pressure again so it is easier to loosen up. When you are done with a towel underneath it all spray some dishwasher mix to get all the fluid off and maybe a few squirts of WD40 then wipe as it is a major corrosive.
 

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I had black clutch fluid and changed it out but lost all lever pressure. QUOTE]

That black clutch fluid is very rare stuff indeed...its usually aged to perfection at say 5-6 years old!!!:eek:

May want to take a look at that fork fluid while you are at it.
 

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bleeding clutch to fork oil

I had black clutch fluid and changed it out but lost all lever pressure. QUOTE]

That black clutch fluid is very rare stuff indeed...its usually aged to perfection at say 5-6 years old!!!:eek:

May want to take a look at that fork fluid while you are at it.
The vtr service manual suggests deflecting the front suspension. My 2003 makes the fork fluid 8 years old. eek! is right.

Thanks Mad Buyer; I took non-cartridge forks apart 20 years ago, dropped the front, put in PVC pipe as preload-didn't know anything but happy-this time we research then : eeeek! Tks, MB, as dr faces music once more.
 
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