RC51 Forums banner

1 - 9 of 9 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
64 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
Can they be removed? Both of these lines are fused into my throttle body. The vacuum tank actually goes nowhere. Just found the other tube venting next to the engine....
 
N

·
Guest
Joined
·
0 Posts
It's been a while since I removed my PAIR system, so I can't recall if those are in fact part of it. My bike isn't immediately accessible otherwise I'd go look to see if they are still installed, but I'm pretty sure they are not. I don't have a CA model and looking through the service manual it does appear there are extra bits, so I wouldn't want to say for sure if you need those, but here's a link to the PAIR removal that might get you started:

http://www.rc51.org/pair.htm
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
606 Posts
I'm guessing they have something to do with California emissions. I don't remember my bike having any of those parts.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,663 Posts
That's the evap canister, evap solenoid valve, and associated hoses.
My bike has them too.
Can you get rid of it? I don't know, I've never messed with mine.
More details about in in the service manual starting on page 1-40
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
2,321 Posts
yes it all comes off. and just plug the hose that comes off the throttle bodies.

its all ridiculous emission california hippie garbage anyways :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
64 Posts
Discussion Starter #8
Thanks yes these can be removed and have to plug off the solenoid connector. Remove all pipesand block holes on throttle bodies. Simple as brain surgery.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
3,239 Posts
1) This is the Pair Valve system



It is totally safe for the bike to remove it. You will only have issues when a MOT inspection is performed on the bike, due to very rich exhaust fumes in CO.
Other than that, the bike is perfectly fine without it.

All you need to do is to close the airbox's inlet nozzles where the two X are plugged on and the two nozzles on the cylinder head's cover where the two O are plugged also on.

2) This is the flapper valve control system



Removing only the items illustrated in the picture leaves the flapper inside the bikes air duct nozzle closed. That means less incoming air in high speeds (rich mixture) but better throttle response in mid and low rpm range.
You can move up a step an remove the flapper from inside the bike's air duct as well but then you'll need to increase your injected fuel quantity throughout the rpm range to meet the proper mixture analogy. That means you need to take the bike to have a custom PCIII map made.

Removing the illustrated components is very easy. Just block the nozzle on the throttle bodies where the X is attached and you're done.

Hope that helps
 
1 - 9 of 9 Posts
Top