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Discussion Starter #1
So I'm in the market for a new bike and have my eye on a couple RC's. I've never ridden or sat on one though. It's just on my bucket list of bikes to own.

I've owned an '02 Bandit 600S, '03 SV1000S and '07 R1. The SV and R1 were modded to be more comfy, but I understand the concept of a sport bike. What are the usual comfort mods and brands that you do on an RC: seats, bars, pegs?

Thanks all!
 

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jeans dont help but when i have on my leathers much better
 

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I find the seating position on the RC similar to the 1000rr with a bit narrower/lower reach to the bars. I have a Corbin on mine which helps quite a bit (my opinion) but 'monkey butt' does sneak in after a couple hours. Usually time for fuel about then anyway though. Should be familiar enough after owning an R1 (which I find a bit more of a radical seating position than the 1000rr). I'm 5'11" and 200#.
 

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RC51s definitely show their racing heritage when you ride them. Moving the bars much higher isn't easily done unless you can relocate the brake and clutch reservoirs or want to cut up the upper fairings. The windscreen is small and doesn't push the air above your head at all. Their isn't a lot of steering lock to use at parking lot speeds and they do like to roast you in the heat. That said, unless you're droning down an interstate you probably won't notice any of that. They are an absolute blast to own...
 

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I have the Corbin seat and adjustable rearsets (sato) and have done over 300 miles in a day and it is WAY more comfortable than my 04 1000RR
 

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after about 2 hours..I have to stretch my legs for 10 - 15 minutes and fill the bike up ...and I'm good for another 2 hours.
 

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Mine is very comfy

With the right clip ons it is much better. I have the ones they quit making several years ago, can't think of the name. But they are visible straighter out annnnd at least 2 inches higher than stock because of the angle. I am short at only 5'8". I think height is a big factor on the RC. I was told they were not made for anyone over 6 foot. My 2 cents :cool: HOOVY
 

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Discussion Starter #13
My R1 sucked after even a short 30 minute commute around town. After I put on a set of heli-bars with manic salamander bar ends I could be on it all day with no problem. The heli-bars didn't give much, if any, rise but reduced the angle of the clipons significantly. That made a world of difference for comfort.

The seat and rearsets were ok at best being they were oem. I was still able to do day long rides though.

I'm 6' even so hopefully I can still fit ok on the bike haha.
 

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RC-51 and the non 'commited'

My R1 sucked after even a short 30 minute commute around town. After I put on a set of heli-bars with manic salamander bar ends I could be on it all day with no problem. The heli-bars didn't give much, if any, rise but reduced the angle of the clipons significantly. That made a world of difference for comfort.

The seat and rearsets were ok at best being they were oem. I was still able to do day long rides though.

I'm 6' even so hopefully I can still fit ok on the bike haha.
The RC51 is not very comfortable in town. The combination of riding position, harshness of the suspension, and with all the start and stop driving in town I feel pretty beat up at the end. Sort of like owning a Ducati.

The configuration of the tank and upper fairing has made any of the normal upgrades either non-existent or limited in their impact. I have been unable to find a set of heli-bars for my SP-1. The seat I had (stock) wasn't great, I bought a reskined stock seat where they used a different foam underneath and it is noticeably better (not great). Vibration seems to be the most noticeable; my hands are part numb after an hour of riding.

Like you said, you sort of know the score with the R1. It's a tough call... I don't find the bike very comfortable and if start and stop commuting traffic is where you see yourself most of the time, i would recommend something that would make that more enjoyable like a DL1000 (DL650), or possibly a more relaxed riding position sport bike like a Z1000, Ninja 1000 (650) or GSX.

...If you see yourself above 75 mph and/or you have a good place to ride (twisties) you will like the bike. Not wanting to personify the machine, but the RC51 has 'soul' and it's just a unique motorcycle to ride.

My two cents.. most of the members here have been with their bike far longer than I have, and are pretty fanatical about their mounts. If comfort is even in your top 5 concerns; you probably would be happier on something else.
 

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I can't say I have been very happy with the comfort of any sports bike but I think I now what your asking. It pretty typical to other sports bikes I've owned or ridden. I am 6'4", 208#, the Corbin seat and adjustable rear-sets are the only upgrade I made both made I big difference to me in my daily commute. Pretty much from early sping to late fall I ride the RC to work, 1/3 highway and 2/3 back roads, 100 mile round trip. I believe you would be happy with it. If you do pull the trigger my suspension settings should work for you, let me know and I'll send them your way.
 

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Personally, I find mine to be quite comfortable without modifying anything as far as ergonomics go. Just remember to relax and not tense up so much…
 

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I've fitted different suspension (Plusher ride without the travel and more agressive geometry) which absorbs bumps properly. Corbin seat & rearsets made a difference. I do quite a lot of mileage. One of my first mods was a double-bubble screen. Works much better.

Recently fitted Giles handlebars which have put more weight on my wrists, but still OK.
For comfort it does help if you regularly ride fast. Accelerate quickly and stay at higher speeds. The air flow will then help support your weight instead of it being your wrists when say you ride at very slow speeds and sit in traffic.

It's a sports bike, so we should expect it to not be all that comfortable, but it's always an event to ride an RC.
 

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It's not as bad as most say. To me it felt very similar to my 2002 R1. The bars are a little lower, the seat is a little smaller and harder. Compared to your R1, the RC51 will feel quite heavy, and top heavy at that. Remember that the RC51 is late 1990's technology. It has a huge fat fuel tank way up high, so-so fuel injection, unforgiving seating position and is built like a tank. I've done commuting (30 miles each way), trackdays, and even a few 500 mile days. While they are doable, I wouldn't recommend doing more than 1 or 2 days in a row. It's a sportbike, and just like any other sportbike, it will be uncomfortable if you don't sit on it correctly. I believe that most, if not all of the complaints about numb hands and wrist issues are due to people not supporting their upper body correctly with their back and abs. Instead, they are pushing on the bars to support their upper body and have a death grip around the bars. Your wrists should also be straight (if you are sitting up straight and not in a corner), as in the back of your hand should follow a flat plane running down your arm. All of this will cause numbness and wrist issues.

A great exercise is to put your balls of your feet up on the pegs and get your chest low over the tank. While holding the bars, move your upper body side to side while also moving your butt from one cheek off one side to one cheek off the other (try and keep your butt off the seat a tad). Do it once with your hands on the bars, and then try and do it without your hands on the bars. All those muscles that you feel being strained in your thighs and core are what should be holding you up. If you hold yourself up with your triceps and biceps, you are doing it wrong.

A set of grip pads on the tank will help greatly. It allows you to have something to hold onto by pinching the bike with your knees. This helps to prevent your balls from smashing against the tank, but it will also make it much easier for you to support your upper body. Part of the reason why most will lean on the their arms is because they have no grip with their legs.

I tried the sargent seat, which is supposed to be the softer of the two (corbin being the other), and it wasn't for me. It was harder than the stock seat, and there really wasn't much padding under my ass. The cupped shape of the seat really didn't work for me either. It seemed too wide, maybe I need to eat more cheeseburgers. I only felt it when moving side to side and then it was just annoying. I went back to the stocker after that and have been happy with it. If your ass is sore after a long ride, you should be putting more weight on the pegs and not just setting the weight of your legs on them.

Clip on bars will help a little. Most will be adjustable enough to help, but they will be restricted by the tank and upper fairing. If you want to go cheap, use a set of stock bars off a 04-07 cbr1000, they will keep the same angle, but raise the bars up. You can get them pretty far up there if you don't mind cutting the upper.

Rearsets are nice. I like them just to have a larger peg to move my feet around on, and the solid mounting is very sturdy. I don't really think they will help with the comfort department though. Almost all of them will move the pegs up and further back, which I can't see helping any. I find it odd that most who spend big money on sets with adjustable positions will almost always use the most forward, lowest setting on them. If you are going to do that, just buy the non adjustable type from tyga usa, woodcraft or attack.

All around best mods for comfort in my book: A shock that isn't sprung for someone twice as heavy as you, stomp grips and a set of clipons and rearsets. All in all, it is like any bike. Some fit people better than others. The only real way to know if you like one is to ride it for a long period of time.
 

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Well, here are my two pennies...what are you buying the bike for? If you're looking at it as a commuter bike, move on. If you're looking for a bike that can give you an exhilarating 2 hour ride or be used as a track toy, look no further. It's like me saying I want to buy a Corvette but still tow my horse trailer. Wrong toy for the job. The RC51 is built to handle corners like no other and above all, be fast. With that come some drawbacks, it isn't built to be comfortable.

I think once you ride the bike for the first time, you won't give a toss about the comfort level as you will be having too much fun. I do use mine to commute on occasion, but I don't like doing that as it isn't what the bike for that and I will flat spot my tires. Instead, I'll buy a cruiser bike for that job. Horses for courses mate.
 

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I tried sitting on a 1098 at a Ducati stand whilst at the Moto GP this weekend and was surprised to find it was considerably more agressive in seating position than my RC.
The CBR600 on the Honda stand by comparison to the SP2 felt like a commuter bike. :D

I'd agree with much of what b.miller123 says but I think his info could be misleading regarding weight on bars.
Riding normally there should be only a light touch on the bars, not upper body weight transmitted through two straight arms.

But whilst it's not good to have too rigid a hold on the bars weight does inevitably get put onto them, under hard braking for example where arms are nearly straight and clearly the bars are taking a fair amount of body weight as it's transferred forward. Without using the bars for some support in such instances, the riders upper body wouldn't remain stable.

It would also be tiring on back muscles in say slow traffic, etc. to not use the bars to provide a little support where there's no significant benefit of not doing so.

So weight should be minimised on the bars as much as possible, but it would be misleading to think that weight should be off the bars in all instances of riding, especially braking.

So it's a combination, whilst minimising weight on bars especially at speed. If you do a lot of slower riding - bringing the bars higher will help, but as someone's said, without after market master cylinders and movable reservoirs, they'll foul the upper fairing. I find rearsets useful as they put the body in a more natural position for faster riding. I don't know if they'll be good for usually slow riding though.

I do around 500km a week, sometimes 200 at a time and don't find I have any wrist problems, or tired back. I do feel less energetic after a long ride, but that's mostly from the buffeting the upper body gets at higher speeds. Riding a bike regularly for longer periods does beef up your back muscles and tighten the muscles in your butt. I found this out the hard way riding up to 14 hours a day for a month - touring through Europe in my younger years.

As for RC51 seat, I found my original to be hopelessly under padded for longer rides. Haven't tried a Sargeant, but the Corbin does help to not get a sore bum. I can be in it all day and don't feel much ache at all. Corbin's quite firm but the foam sort of moulds itself to your contours, so is more comfortable than the original. It's quite heavy but worth the sacrifice of a little added weight IMHO. I wouldn't want to switch back to the original.

As others say though - the RC is a special bike and there's a lot of knowledge here to help you make it a lot more special. If you enjoy the bike for it's merits, rather than for what it wasn't really designed for (Including sitting in traffic) then in turn it'll serve you well.
 
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