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Discussion Starter #1
Hello everyone! I'm new to the site as of today. I'm looking into purchasing an exhaust for my 03 and found this site. I have 28,000 some miles on my bike. I bought in new. I'm looking into a jardine exhaust, my bike is still stock, (go ahead laugh it up I know ridiculous) anyway I'm wondering if I need to purchase a programer with the exhaust to have it run correctly? I have K&N air filters now with the restrictors out. I would like to purchase a 15-41 chain kit also. I have no adverse effects from the filters. I understand all technical info, i have been a journeyman tech at Ford for 10 years so give it to me striaght. Just wondering what the limits of the bike are to self adjust with an exhaust without having to program it and dyno it.
I currently run a mixture of 111 leaded fuel and 93 unleaded. I have been running this for at least 3 years. I have noticed the responsiveness is smoother throught the rpm range, runs cooler at cruising speeds, but gets hot quickly at idle, or stop lights. Never exceeds 230 F though. Anyways any info that someone may have experienced over the years would be greatly appreciated.
 

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The temperatures you report are roughly typical.
I average up to around 221 during stop and goes.
The fans kick in at 218 and cool it down to 205 in just a few minutes.
Once moving in town I usually see 205 to 209.
Out on the freeway or out in the country I've seen the temp drop to 179.

There's pretty much no adjustability for exhaust or intake changes stock.
The best bet is to get a power commander PCIIIUSB and dyno the bike.
The bike should run much better when corrected to 13.2:1 air/fuel ratio, which is the best power making ratio.

While I run them myself, I've read several reports that the stock paper air filters flow more air than the K&N's.
The best way to know would be back to back dyno runs with stock and K&N filters.
If I see the graphs then I'll know for sure. Otherwise it's speculation to me.

The stock final ratio is very tall for the bike.
The best bet is either 15F/41R or 15F/42R.

The best slip-ons are the Sato low-mounts. Not only do they have a great mid-range torque curve, they sound awesome!! Drive by cars and set off the alarms kind of sound.
But they are a bit pricey. And I can understand why one would buy other brands.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Thank-you for the reply! You seem to have good knowledge of the RC51, and for that matter automotive/motorcycle knowlegde as well. I apperciate the input. I'm getting a little bored and want some more power out of this bike. It's been a great bike, I just don't want to blow it up. HAHAHA I have seen all kinds of mods, big bore kits, pipes, etc. saying the performance they get. Just never know if anyone understands how it works, or just paid someone to do it. I also have tried to find a lowering kit. Yeah stupid I know to upset the great engineering of the bike, but I'm curious seeing as I'm only
5' 6" how it would actually effect the handling. It would be nice not to have to worry about the wind knocking me over at a stop light. LOL! Problem being is I would have to cut and weld extensions in the link, and that makes me slightly nervous. I wish I could get a casted peice so I could just swap it and if it sucks swap it back. You heard of anything, or anyone out there who has lowered them?
 

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The problem is the RC51 uses a square U-shaped cast piece that connects the swingarm to the shock link.
You'd need to find a place that has either different placed mounting holes or possibly adjustable links on either side to lower the rear. And there's not much space on either side.
Some bikes just have a separate pair of shock links or "dog bones" that are easily adjusted to lower the bike.
However I've heard of RC51's being lowered so I guess it's possible.
Maybe it will turn up in my searches.
 
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