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Discussion Starter #1
So I bought a house before it went to tax sale on the very inexpensive side. (Some of you East and West Coast folks would be crying if I told you.:D

She is on a half acre just adjacent to a golf course....to which that is another hobby of mine.;)

Rock I know is in a similar boat so I thought I would post up what I will be spending my extra time on.









I am currently pulling all of the sub floor out so I have a nice flat surface to work with to lay porcelain tile.

New HVAC system will be delivered in about a week and I will get it installed shortly along with the new roof. ( I will not be replacing the roof.)

She has good bones but needs some help to which I will be supplying.
 

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On a slab or does it have a basement ? Whats the sq footage ?3 bedrooms I presume / Congrats
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Its on a 5 block crawl space. Three bedroom and just shy of 1,500 square feet. 2.5 car garage and on a 1/2 acre corner lot. This is my home base retirement home.

A bit further from Indy but at night, I hear only the occasional air traffic and the sprinkler system on the golf course.:cool:
 

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Very nice indeed!!! And yes, your purchase price versus mine is outrageous :( but hopefully my cards will play out well in 3yrs.

I'll snap a few more war-zone photos later as I just completed our kitchen demo (and I'm now likely infected with asbestos :eek:)

Good luck on your project and I'll race you to the finish line :D
 

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Good luck on your project and I'll race you to the finish line :D
You too! That race thing ain't happenin'....:D My perfectionist ways are getting in the way of quick progress.:rolleyes:
 

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You too! That race thing ain't happenin'....:D My perfectionist ways are getting in the way of quick progress.:rolleyes:

I know, just said that because I'm on a very tight schedule.

Here is a shot of tearing down all the drop ceiling
ImageUploadedByMO Free1406947879.518456.jpg

I'll snap a few tomorrow of the gutting of the kitchen.
 

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Oooh paneling too.....I think you topped me there.:eek::p

What is above the drop ceilings? Is it solid?


This will definitely be a time sucker for sure.
 

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That is the basement, the house is a ranch with a basement.

Paneling is everywhere (upper level and lower).

Under the drop ceiling was this, it is the subfloor/original hardwood floors.
ImageUploadedByMO Free1406949360.789232.jpg

I also have a mix match of plaster (with trace amounts of asbestos), drywall, and wall paper throughout.

I'm demoing and using a small crew for misc workings. Gutting and updating a 100yr old home is on a whole new level for me.
 

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It took our carpenter / builder & his son + myself 9 months to make our (250 year old) home habitable, replacing ceilings, floors and walls in most rooms. Don't under estimate the time & money it takes to do these things. Multiply estimates by 2 to 3 times!

The other thing you'll find is that progress really slows when the house becomes comfortable and projects that aren't essential take much longer to complete!
 

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Discussion Starter #10
That is the basement, the house is a ranch with a basement.

Paneling is everywhere (upper level and lower).

Under the drop ceiling was this, it is the subfloor/original hardwood floors.
View attachment 66010

I also have a mix match of plaster (with trace amounts of asbestos), drywall, and wall paper throughout.

I'm demoing and using a small crew for misc workings. Gutting and updating a 100yr old home is on a whole new level for me.
My first house was a 1868 model:D Solid house but man did the termites love that native timber they Used to build it.
It took our carpenter / builder & his son + myself 9 months to make our (250 year old) home habitable, replacing ceilings, floors and walls in most rooms. Don't under estimate the time & money it takes to do these things. Multiply estimates by 2 to 3 times!

The other thing you'll find is that progress really slows when the house becomes comfortable and projects that aren't essential take much longer to complete!
I and my family are doing this so, Maybe extra for parts but labor may cost me an extra bar b que. Or two:D

You have to use your resources and stay optimistic here....I could have bought a nice sister for the 03 for what I paid for just appliance :eek::D
 

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I maintain 3 buildings with 146 suites on a huge lot.
Feeling what you guys are going through somewhat. :)
Renos are a big part of what I do on site.
 

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So here are some follow up photos of my money pit :D

ImageUploadedByMO Free1407017449.609270.jpg
ImageUploadedByMO Free1407017467.704637.jpg
ImageUploadedByMO Free1407017477.091246.jpg
ImageUploadedByMO Free1407017487.680412.jpg

Pretty much every sqft needs some form of work in some way, shape, and form.

Although it looks bad, the bones on this 100yr old bird are actually pretty good. Decent lot, and a HUGE garage which is something I'm excited about.

Hopefully I can get to an 80% solution over the next 60days and without going over budget by 2x-3x like Stig mentioned (as I would have to declare bankruptcy :eek:)
 

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I maintain 3 buildings with 146 suites on a huge lot.
Feeling what you guys are going through somewhat. :)
Renos are a big part of what I do on site.

Oh Wow...how I wish my projects were like that :(
 

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Our home started out a lot like your's weyrauchRC51. Every surface was in need of replacement and upgrading. Lots of insulation and vast amounts of labour went into it.
I learnt how to plaster too in the process. Today we're still at work (Albeit much slower).
Jondog's helped me out forwarding a couple of things from the States which we couldn't get here - and it's taken us 6 months to make an en suite shower room (nearly finished...!)

We still have a poorly done extension with bathroom I want to knock down and have rebuilt into a nice utilities room & bathroom, to replace the rusty old bathtub & horribly tiled one which currently exists. These projects don't end for a long time in my experience, so it goes on and on. What I can say is - make sure you do everything to the best of your ability so you won't have to do it twice. Lots of wall receptacles (be sure to use thick wire and plenty of safety insulation to avoid any chance of electrical fires) are useful. Place them higher so they won't be visible when furniture is near them.
Pay lots of attention to lighting fixtures too. There are good books on this stuff...
We did most of our floors in Oak, which wasn't too expensive, just work intensive!

Here's some pics of our project. After we finished, we're going over it again, replacing all windows around the house (It's all glass round about 70% of the perimeter) with anodised aluminium double glazed. Like I say, the costs mount up. Fortunately stuff is cheapest in the US - most of our fixtures, etc. came from there.

How it started out.


Making a helluva mess.


Raising ceilings in the living rooms.




Insulating floors from bugs, cold, etc.


Finished Surfaces in the lounges.


Stove installed (Roof is thatch under copper layer, so with earthquakes a frequent occurence we had to engineer it very well). All stove parts were sent from the States where they're much cheaper than here.


Taking down the scaffolding after completing fitment of a copper clad chimney to match the rest of the roof.

 

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Our's didn't cost a lot in materials (But still about 3 times more than I'd anticipated) and it helped I didn't have to pay for it all in one go, but there was a lot of time spent on it.
I'd say - best do one room at a time. Finish it, then begin to use it and go onto the next one and so on.

Stove in use:


Corner lounge.


Entrance Hall. The spiral staircase took our carpenter 20 days to make from raw planks of wood. That's a lot of labour!


Room upstairs - was just an old storage area original for keeping raw silk.


Turned into this.


We only begun to live in the house after this work was done, as my wife was pregnant and our son was born here at home 2 months after we moved in. Moving from 300km away was difficult too, but friends helped us a lot. I remember driving them home afterward and being unable to make it back. Too tired - I just parked on the side of the highway and slept for an hour or two before moving another couple of kms and finding myself unable to drive again! :eek:

Worth all the hard work, long hours and expense - would I do it again?
No - done it before in the UK on a smaller place and now here - but we're still not finished and 2 of the rooms in the house aren't yet in use because of boxes, etc. for other work in progress.

With young kids in the house, garden, etc. to look after too - I think it might take us another 5 years to get where I want to with the buildings, but the thing to do is just continue at a manageable pace. Slow is good as it gives me time to really think about how I want it to be (My wife just leaves it all to me, as she can't envision what stuff can be like when in it's raw state - since she also has no building experience or skills).

I sometimes think if I'd been able to buy this place 10 years earlier - and how far we'd be along now... Hmmm, I think the key for us was finding a very good carpenter friend who is capable of doing pretty much anything, who charged only a fair wage. He's been a godsend (He's also a missionary so maybe that's especially true! :D).

You're ahead of me, weyrauchRC51, I still don't have a garage! :eek:

It's great to do stuff yourselves though guys. You'll be able to sit back, relax & enjoy when it's all done....!
 

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would love to learn how to remodel/update a home.
my apartment here in Brooklyn is about the size of your living room.
looks nice, would love to see how it turns out.
good luck.
 

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You're ahead of me, weyrauchRC51, I still don't have a garage! :eek:

It's great to do stuff yourselves though guys. You'll be able to sit back, relax & enjoy when it's all
done....!



Simply Amazing Stig!!! I wish we could settle down and do a project like yours...for us though this is just a temporary home and an investment opportunity. We will be rolling stones for another 15-18yrs :D

The only unfortunate part is that I'm in a pretty tight timeline, but I will get most of it done...just at a bit of a premium :eek: which means very little work in the RC :(

Luckily I got a lot of the good bits for the RC so I think I'll manage (except my full carbon fairing kit from Ducky).
 

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Thanks buddy. I'm older and this started about 17 years ago when I bought a slightly derelict but structurally sound bungalow for around $100,000 in the UK which I spent about 2 months working on before moving into and a year renovating the inside of before moving to Japan. I had to have tenants then as I couldn't afford to do the renovations & pay the mortgage on my salary, so it had to be done within that time.

When you're in your 20's / 30's you have a lot more energy & motivation than in your 40's, so time is on your side here. Mine is the product of 15 years or so difference having started from a small house like yourself.

Back then as I couldn't afford to hire help I had friends come and help. I'd ask them to spend a weekend sanding floors (With a machine) or help knock out ceilings, paint, etc. We also removed asbestos ceilings in that house - with lots of water to reduce dust, all doors & windows open and masks to avoid inhaling too. You don't want any of that stuff in your's or your family's lungs. Even the tenants helped clean out a derelict pool, break concrete ground in the back garden (with a sledge hammer), etc. It was fun, as there was a husband & wife professional musician couple living there. So I'd hear them composing songs singing & playing guitar whilst I painted and we had some great pool parties with a live band in the garden shortly before I moved away.

After 10 years of renting it out to them I sold that house in the UK in 2007 as I could see the market had peaked, saved & invested the money for 4 years and bought this place for much what I sold the other place in UK for. Old houses in Japan are inexplicably very low value compared to new so I took advantage of that and bought a very old one, that was solid in it's build and full of character.

Assuming the US housing market continues to rise over the next 10-20 years,it's possible you can do something similar, although you will probably need to bear in mind that house prices in a country usually vary laterally. In other words; if your house value goes up (or down) so will other properties. If you move between states that may be a different matter though, I think...

Anyways, what's nice is you can make it what you want to but renovating houses is more work than building them from scratch as you have to carefully remove and build around existing structure, etc. and often find extra stuff that needs doing before you can complete the job at hand. If you're doing it as an investment you'll need to be mindful of costs though. In my case I didn't want to be doing anything again when I'm old, nor have my kids have to do it either - so we took a lot of care to do everything right.

As for the RC51 etc. it's OK - as long as it runs well and isn't deteriorating, there's time for that fun later. Right now you need to keep your vision for the interior in focus as that'll be your inspiration when you're tired and frustrated along the way. Both you and madbuyer! :)
....me too, as 3 years into the project I'm not done yet either. :( I only find time to ride / tinker every now & then (I rode it this morning just to go help a local friend get her car started after the battery went flat overnight - hardly what I could call making good use of the RC, but hey - there's stuff to do!).

When our shower room & solar heated water system is finished I'll share some before & after pictures. It'll be fun to see progress from your projects too. Looking forward to seeing how things develop.

BTW, if you want some recommendations on books for lighting ideas, sources in the States for fixtures, etc. I can share if you want. You have a lot of inexpensive stuff there.
 

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I maintain 3 buildings with 146 suites on a huge lot.
Feeling what you guys are going through somewhat. :)
Renos are a big part of what I do on site.
cement board would help that situation out . Better than green board
 
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