RC51 Forums banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
158 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Well my 2002 Rc is ready for Portland International Raceway! I'll be doing my first track day in June since I'm still saving up for a suit! My bike runs great, it has an 03 motor and everything else is original 02. All other equipment such as Rotors, calipers, frame, suspension has 45k miles. I got a new set of OEM sprockets/chain. Running with 2 arrow carbon fiber pipes.

Bought two sets of uppers and lowers, both sets were really scratched up so I did some sanding, priming and painting. I didn't do a 100% professional job on the fairings, as it was my first time repairing, but they definitely sure as hell look better than before!

I really look forward to racing by next year or 2016. Just curious if I should invest money into better performance for my rc51? Or would it be a waste of money seeing as newer bikes are lighter/faster (updated). Or should I just invest in a used bike and turn into a race bike? ImageUploadedByMotorcycle1398297109.769028.jpg ImageUploadedByMotorcycle1398297132.054248.jpg





Sent from Motorcycle.com App
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,536 Posts
Bike looks really good!

As for actually racing, sadly it would be a waste of money to try and make the bike competitive with modern bikes. A newer 600 beats the RC around the track all day with equal riders on it.

Fun bike to have, and I recently got into track riding and plan on using my RC only...but it is for track day use, as I have no aspirations of racing.

Enjoy our first track day!!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,186 Posts
But what about unequal riders? That's where I go. Most people vastly overspend on the bike and vastly underspend on rider training/improvement and experience.

Race tires are the first thing, which is a safety margin for you. If money is an issue, source take-offs in good shape from riders who ride new. Did that for 2 years. Then I had the sources to get great prices on new race tires and at that point I was the one who sold take-offs to the up and comers and stunters.

Beyond tires the rider is 90% of the equation. I see 600's beat 1000's around the track because of the rider. Did that myself. I won open superbike races on a 600. So investing in rider improvement and seat time is where you want the money to go for the first couple years at least. Maximize your track days and rider training. In Canada with 6 months of good weather, I did 14 track days in one year for example.

As you get to the fastest group, and then fast in it, do bike and parts upgrades, such as suspension, and from take-offs to new tires. No need to break the bank either. Race-Tech will do the job just fine for upgrades for example if you are on a budget.

After one year of dedicated track I obtained spare wheels/rotors, so I always had a set of tires waiting in the wings. What a difference that makes.

Beyond that, report back on your exploits, with pics!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,536 Posts
But what about unequal riders?

I would "assume" at a professional race level the margin of skill level would be "closer" to even...than the margin of difference you see at your regular track day within the different groups.

I completely agree with what you say...skill plays a tremendous factor. I'm no stud at the track, but in the intermediate group I would pass R1's, CBR1000's, and my personal favorite (1199's)...but then I would get blitzed by some super skilled 600's (even on the straight away).

In the advanced group there were tons of liter bikes that would have lapped me sadly.

I agree that if you are of higher skill, then the bike plays less of a role. Eventually you will hit the limit of the ol' RC and realize that she is just a little too old to being running at the "top" level with the younger generation.

I still love it though...its fun to usually be the only RC at the track :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,186 Posts
That would be pros with the black #'s in my area. They are the fastest. At that point the bike, the setup, and the money make a big difference.

In amateur class the skill level is totally all over the place. I lapped the slowest amateurs in a 9 lap race. The RC will do all you need in amateur class if you want to use the bike. But there is different and easier. There is a reason the 600 class is so fast and popular.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
897 Posts
I'm no pro by any means, but when I did a track day at Heartland Park on my'02 sv650 I was absolutely shredding 90% of the guys out there on 600s and 1000s. Of course most would blow past me on the straights as my sv could only muster like 125 mph downhill, but everywhere else I was killing them. On the other hand, for perspective, in the long chicane I remember doing around 90 while scraping the pegs a bit, scared to death, and I look up and the instructor is passing me on the OUTSIDE one-handed looking back at me while correcting me on foot placement. Haha, I do agree though that the margin of skill is probably much closer at the higher levels. I would definitely agree that rather spending money and time in upgrades, it would be better to educate more! Im sure you could get pretty far with your rc, and you'd have the coolest bike out there!

Sent from Motorcycle.com Free App
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,536 Posts
I'm no pro by any means, but when I did a track day at Heartland Park on my'02 sv650 I was absolutely shredding 90% of the guys out there on 600s and 1000s. Of course most would blow past me on the straights as my sv could only muster like 125 mph downhill, but everywhere else I was killing them. On the other hand, for perspective, in the long chicane I remember doing around 90 while scraping the pegs a bit, scared to death, and I look up and the instructor is passing me on the OUTSIDE one-handed looking back at me while correcting me on foot placement. Haha, I do agree though that the margin of skill is probably much closer at the higher levels. I would definitely agree that rather spending money and time in upgrades, it would be better to educate more! Im sure you could get pretty far with your rc, and you'd have the coolest bike out there!

Sent from Motorcycle.com Free App

Your story of the instructor reminds me of my second time at a track day. The owner/main coordinator of the event was a former racer and was offering 2-up rides. On a long sweeper he comes blasting past me and 3-4 other bikes with a passenger :eek: it was actually pretty cool to see.

All the instructors I've worked with have been great, and they really put into perspective how much there is to learn....especially when they say they are nowhere near the too level guys...very humbling.
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top