RC51 Forums banner

21 - 39 of 39 Posts

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,904 Posts
It's a god job you guys are both on opposite ends of the country, your phones and e-mails would be clogged with pleas to enlist your tools and expertise;):D
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
488 Posts
Well, now that I am looking to do this job I am reviewing this excellent how to. Thank you for your efforts Brett.

This is probably a "one time" thing for me and I am trying to decide whether to do it myself by making what I need or sending the forks into the Honda dealer and letting them do it. There are no reputable shops around me so I would be forced to have them done at the dealer.

I spoke with the dealer and they advised they normally only replace the seal and gaskets. It certainly makes sense to me to replace all o-rings and such while everything is disasembled. I thought perhaps purchasing all parts via internet then sending them with the forks and telling them to replace all supplied parts, but I have a difficult time trusting a dealership. Between a rock and a hard place.

In my experience with dealerships; everything is half-ass. I got a feeling that they would only replace the seals and put the rest of the parts on the shelf. I highly doubt they would measure a correct amount of fluid either. I am guessing they would dump in a quart and call it a day. I really do not want to purchase any tools in order to do this job. Advice to those who have tackled it? Thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,327 Posts
Well, now that I am looking to do this job I am reviewing this excellent how to. Thank you for your efforts Brett.

This is probably a "one time" thing for me and I am trying to decide whether to do it myself by making what I need or sending the forks into the Honda dealer and letting them do it. There are no reputable shops around me so I would be forced to have them done at the dealer.

I spoke with the dealer and they advised they normally only replace the seal and gaskets. It certainly makes sense to me to replace all o-rings and such while everything is disasembled. I thought perhaps purchasing all parts via internet then sending them with the forks and telling them to replace all supplied parts, but I have a difficult time trusting a dealership. Between a rock and a hard place.

In my experience with dealerships; everything is half-ass. I got a feeling that they would only replace the seals and put the rest of the parts on the shelf. I highly doubt they would measure a correct amount of fluid either. I am guessing they would dump in a quart and call it a day. I really do not want to purchase any tools in order to do this job. Advice to those who have tackled it? Thanks
You might just come right out and ask Brett or Sub ;)
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,996 Posts
Discussion Starter #25
For a one time deal, if you don't trust your forks to a local shop, send them out to somewhere reputable. I'm lucky that I had a couple shops close by that I would trust to do the work if needed. If I didn't and I didn't want to do them myself, I'd rather drive a couple hours to a good shop.

Ask around a local riders, trackday, or racing forum. I'm sure somebody can reccomend a shop within driving distance. If it is far away, I'm sure you could make arrangements for them to be done while you wait. Just remember that this time of year, shops are busy.

You might also be able to find someone that is just a fellow rider with the correct tools and a thirst for alcoholic beverages.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
488 Posts
For a one time deal, if you don't trust your forks to a local shop, send them out to somewhere reputable. I'm lucky that I had a couple shops close by that I would trust to do the work if needed. If I didn't and I didn't want to do them myself, I'd rather drive a couple hours to a good shop.

Ask around a local riders, trackday, or racing forum. I'm sure somebody can reccomend a shop within driving distance. If it is far away, I'm sure you could make arrangements for them to be done while you wait. Just remember that this time of year, shops are busy.

You might also be able to find someone that is just a fellow rider with the correct tools and a thirst for alcoholic beverages.
I live 450 miles from the closest track lol. No real spotbike riders around here. All sportbike guys around here are running mid 90's or earlier 600's. I'm in middle of nowhere Maine. I am going to try and get the season out of it as it is a very subtle leak right now. If it gets worse I will be forced to get them done.

Seems like it is always something:banghead:

Sent from Motorcycle.com Free App
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
8,328 Posts
Hord Power does an excellent job with forks. There is probably a Race Tech affiliate or another respectable shop close by. Take a look at their website.


Sent from Motorcycle.com App
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,996 Posts
Discussion Starter #29
Yep, I've done the same before. You can also use a piece of camera film. Just be aware that you may have not pulled the piece of dirt out, but pushed it back into the fork fluid.

I'd say it is probably time to change the fluid out anyways (great time for new seals). Of course you can push it, but be aware that the piece of dirt may get back into the seal area.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
488 Posts
Yep, I've done the same before. You can also use a piece of camera film. Just be aware that you may have not pulled the piece of dirt out, but pushed it back into the fork fluid.

I'd say it is probably time to change the fluid out anyways (great time for new seals). Of course you can push it, but be aware that the piece of dirt may get back into the seal area.
Brett always pissing in my Cheerios but good point, I wanted to get the season out of it but my concerns will prevent me from waiting. I am going to tackle this project soon. I think between my father and myself we can come up with what we need to do the job. He worked on snowmobiles and atvs for years and has a shop full of tools. We will need to jerry up a rig for compression but I think we'll manage.

Is a fork seal driver necessary or can I put the parts in the freezer and drop them in? I know it works for bearing as I did the front and rear wheel bearings by freezing them then heating the rims a bit with a parts heater. And as far as measuring fork oil I have to assume I can stick a ruler in and measure distance? Your write up is excellent but I will have a much better understanding once I actually take the fork apart for myself and look.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,996 Posts
Discussion Starter #32
Brett always pissing in my Cheerios but good point, I wanted to get the season out of it but my concerns will prevent me from waiting. I am going to tackle this project soon. I think between my father and myself we can come up with what we need to do the job. He worked on snowmobiles and atvs for years and has a shop full of tools. We will need to jerry up a rig for compression but I think we'll manage.

Is a fork seal driver necessary or can I put the parts in the freezer and drop them in? I know it works for bearing as I did the front and rear wheel bearings by freezing them then heating the rims a bit with a parts heater. And as far as measuring fork oil I have to assume I can stick a ruler in and measure distance? Your write up is excellent but I will have a much better understanding once I actually take the fork apart for myself and look.
For the spring compressor, I would recommend at least picking up the traxxion kit and doing something like this if two people can't do it: http://www.tlzone.net/forums/suzuki-tl1000r-tl1000s-forum/81676-cheap-diy-fork-spring-compressor-tool.html

Or you can make your own, something like this: http://www.yamahafz1oa.com/forum/showthread.php?p=1717503

Just don't make some hokey shit like I did. I would not reccomend using hooks or the plastic one I did with the bolts. It just wobbles and is hard to keep from touching the fork (hence wrapping it in towels). I think using long bolts, and hooking the strap to the bolts is the key on that one.


For the fork seal driver, I've heard of people using pvc pipe that is the right inside diameter (43mm is the stock seal size). Just cut it in half and you're good. Make sure to lube the seals before you try to install them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,327 Posts
For the spring compressor, I would recommend at least picking up the traxxion kit and doing something like this if two people can't do it: http://www.tlzone.net/forums/suzuki-tl1000r-tl1000s-forum/81676-cheap-diy-fork-spring-compressor-tool.html

Or you can make your own, something like this: http://www.yamahafz1oa.com/forum/showthread.php?p=1717503

Just don't make some hokey shit like I did. I would not reccomend using hooks or the plastic one I did with the bolts. It just wobbles and is hard to keep from touching the fork (hence wrapping it in towels). I think using long bolts, and hooking the strap to the bolts is the key on that one.


For the fork seal driver, I've heard of people using pvc pipe that is the right inside diameter (43mm is the stock seal size). Just cut it in half and you're good. Make sure to lube the seals before you try to install them.
SBK DREW has a seal driver for sale.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,996 Posts
Discussion Starter #35
The Motion Pro seal driver is super nice to use.
http://www.motionpro.com/motorcycle/partno/08-0490/
That's the same one I used. I didn't really like it. I've never used the other simple two piece design ones, but it seems like they would be easier to use. The round ring that locks the two halves together kept rotating as I'd try to hold the thing on there. Of course whenever I let go of it was also when the ring just happened to be lined up. It also seemed like the tolerances are too big. The thing seemed a little loose when it was all together.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
1,996 Posts
Discussion Starter #36
Found this on another forum. Much better option than what I did for a home-made tool:
http://pnwriders.com/portland-region/185124-fork-tools.html#post2977369


If you aren't opposed to DIY ghetto tools head over to Harbor Freight and pick up a three way edging clamp (no it's not an adult toy) and ratchet strap.

1. Pop off the little feet on the opposing screws of the clamp to expose small ball-ends. (This is easily done by unscrewing the screw until the feet pop off)



2. Cover the ball-ends with a bit of small tubing, wire insulation (cat 5 works great), electrical tape, etc. Just something to help prevent marring the plastic spacer.



3. Then use the ratchet strap to squish and access the hidden nut. You can probably work out the rest.

 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
488 Posts
Nice, thanks guys
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
148 Posts
My bolt didn't want to come out after loosening and removing the damper cartridge, so I removed the compression damping adjuster:

The o-ring keeps the bolt from coming out and you can't get hold of it from the outside. What you can do is take a long wooden dowel or even an old wooden yardstick (whittle the end down) and tap it out from inside. It took very little force to bump it out and you won't have to take apart the adjuster.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
help...slid down white spacer

Nice to meet you. I'm Kaz. I am Japanese. Therefore English may not be good. I also want to maintain the RVT SP2 front fork.
I'm having a hard time sliding the white preload spacer down. In the initial state, the hole for hooking on the spacer is hidden in the top cap. So I have to slide the spacer down to expose the hole in order to hook it. But when I tried to slide it, it took a lot of effort. So I have a question.
When you hook into the hole, do you attach the hook with a strong force to pull the spacer down?
Or are you hooking the hook with a tool that keeps the spacer down?
 
21 - 39 of 39 Posts
Top