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Discussion Starter #1
So i was approached by a guy today who was talking to me about my 51, he was talking about his brothers who "regularly hits 200 mph" i began to educate him but it was impossible. then he began to tell me how the r1 is the fastest production bike out there at 230 mph. so i ended the conversation and walked off.

this got me thinking about the fastest bike out there. so according to sport rider the fastest bone stock motorcycle to date is still the 99 busa at 189.6 after that every other big bike has the gentlemans agreement 186 limiter.

http://www.sportrider.com/performance_numbers/146_motorcycle_performance_numbers/

ive been looking at it seems they are right so far. now remember i mean bone stock/showroom stock.
 

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Pretty much the understood norm for box stock bikes.
 

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The main limit of speed is wind drag.
Aerodynamic resistance increases with the cube of the speed.
Double the speed, triple the wind resistance.

The less aerodynamic the vehicle, the more power is yet needed.
At 200 MPH or better, it takes a lot of power to push through the air.
The fastest MotoGP bike went around 219, and that took around 250 HP and a narrow bike frontal area.

This is the reason for the shape of the Hayabusa.
It wasn't a styling exercise. It is actually one of the most aerodynamic bikes on the market.
I'm sure it might go a bit faster than 193 MPH ('99 unrestricted model) if it was narrower.
The bike is wide to accommodate the engine, which adds more drag.

I believe this is why the BMW S1000RR reaches or may slightly exceed the '99 Busa's speed, as its engine is a narrower design and has less drag, even though its bodywork is less aerodynamic overall.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
yeah from what im looking at most of the literbikes and up will exceed the 186 mark by a decent margin when de-restricted.
 

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I hear story's like that all the time from kids at the Q steak and lube bike nites.
In my area its the gixxer guys that talk all the smack and say those bikes rule on every aspect.
I have looked at their tires and seen the huge chix strips and well that just settles it with me. Kinda funny to just go along with them to seen just how far they stretch it. But once they claim they break the sound barrier than I'm done.
 

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it's kinda funny how the OPs conversation reminds me of my 12yo son's same question everytime he sees a fast-looking car or bike,

"is it faster than your bike?"

"No son, I have yet to find another bike that can rip your arms out of your sockets."

Stunned amazement and silence...
 

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I too find it funny how so many riders talk crap about how good they are and they take these corners at break neck speeds and drag their knee all the time. And all you have to do is look at their back tire for confirmation. The evidence is right there yet they still brag n boast.
 

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I too find it funny how so many riders talk crap about how good they are and they take these corners at break neck speeds and drag their knee all the time. And all you have to do is look at their back tire for confirmation. The evidence is right there yet they still brag n boast.

While those guys are annoying to me too, you also have to consider not many people drag knees on the street, even if they are capable. Look at my Pilot Road 2 rear for example, I've got obvious strips and a center that is squaring off. That's because I don't try to drag knees or put my bike at that limit on the street. Some guys I ride with do and I've seen too many of them wreck at high speeds or lose their licenses. I can't afford to do either (see my post about my son above).

Then look at my Q2s takeoffs I sold at the end of the last track season. Trust me, they were used right up to the edges. I'm no racer, rather a casual trackday enthusiast who can keep pace in Nesba I group.
 

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I too find it funny how so many riders talk crap about how good they are and they take these corners at break neck speeds and drag their knee all the time. And all you have to do is look at their back tire for confirmation. The evidence is right there yet they still brag n boast.

I admit it I have chicken strips on my street bike tires... Just doesn't seem safe to scrub that last 1/8" off of them :)

 

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I admit it I have chicken strips on my street bike tires... Just doesn't seem safe to scrub that last 1/8" off of them :)

lol. Front tire as well. That's how to ride a bike.
 

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I laugh at people who think chicken strips (or lack of) are an indicator of skill.
Technically they are... As with every generalization you can get a pretty good idea of how proficient a rider is by observing the wear pattern of the tires. Scrubbing the rubber edge to edge doesn't automatically mean somebody is good rider, but it does usually indicate someone that is comfortable & confident on their motorcycle.

In all my years I have never been passed by a better rider only to find out that when we get to the end of the road they have big parts of the tire that are unused on either side so in that regard it is all relevant. Sure you can have a better rider that has more reserve and does not ride hard enough to use up all the tire, but they are not moving at a quicker pace than I am without using up all the available contact patch the tire has to offer. Let's face it while the quick way around the turn is to reduce lean angle to have more contact patch for braking and acceleration the reason we ride is for the lean...
 

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Technically they are... As with every generalization you can get a pretty good idea of how proficient a rider is by observing the wear pattern of the tires. Scrubbing the rubber edge to edge doesn't automatically mean somebody is good rider, but it does usually indicate someone that is comfortable & confident on their motorcycle.

In all my years I have never been passed by a better rider only to find out that when we get to the end of the road they have big parts of the tire that are unused on either side so in that regard it is all relevant. Sure you can have a better rider that has more reserve and does not ride hard enough to use up all the tire, but they are not moving at a quicker pace than I am without using up all the available contact patch the tire has to offer. Let's face it while the quick way around the turn is to reduce lean angle to have more contact patch for braking and acceleration the reason we ride is for the lean...
Being comfortable with using all of your tire, and using all of your tire because you are skilled enough to need the extra contact patch/lean angle are two different things. The use of "chicken strips" as a test of skill is akin to getting your knee down or a guy with worn down knee sliders. Getting a knee down tells me that you are comfortable and loose on the bike. It can also mean that you have horrible body position and are hanging off the bike way too much. Maybe enough to completely straighten out your outside arm and rotate your hips to the outside of the corner. To me, the only real indicator is riding skill (on track anyways) is lap times.

I don't have any dreams that I will change your opinions Mike, as you have been around the scene much longer than I have and are undoubtedly faster than I am. I've done enough riding on my own and taken the advice of people I know and trust with mountains of skill and experience over me. My conclusion is that chicken strips are just silly to use as a metric for skill level.

Here is a good read from the current #1 plate holder in our local racing club. He sums it up better than I can:
http://2-fast.org/bigger-chicken-strips-a-paradigm-shift
 

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Being comfortable with using all of your tire, and using all of your tire because you are skilled enough to need the extra contact patch/lean angle are two different things. The use of "chicken strips" as a test of skill is akin to getting your knee down or a guy with worn down knee sliders. Getting a knee down tells me that you are comfortable and loose on the bike. It can also mean that you have horrible body position and are hanging off the bike way too much. Maybe enough to completely straighten out your outside arm and rotate your hips to the outside of the corner. To me, the only real indicator is riding skill (on track anyways) is lap times.

I don't have any dreams that I will change your opinions Mike, as you have been around the scene much longer than I have and are undoubtedly faster than I am. I've done enough riding on my own and taken the advice of people I know and trust with mountains of skill and experience over me. My conclusion is that chicken strips are just silly to use as a metric for skill level.

Here is a good read from the current #1 plate holder in our local racing club. He sums it up better than I can:
http://2-fast.org/bigger-chicken-strips-a-paradigm-shift

That's good stuff and Mark is one of my best friends. He was just down here the last couple days doing the Yamaha school. What he is depicting is a textbook perfect example of street riding mentality where the average street rider is well... basically just not that proficient. In that regard I agree with him 100%. What he is really hinting at and I just verified this with him on the phone is the inherent risk of using more lean angle than is required and again I agree with him 100% whether it is street or track.


My point to that is with higher caliber riders rather than those new to sport riding or precision riding as I like to think of it, I am positive that no rider at that level is ever going to out pace another by using less tire. It just doesn't happen like that with higher skill set riders. That whole blowing by a rider and barely leaning the bike thing only works when you are chasing down mostly inexperienced riders.
 

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My last set of tires barely had any strips leftover, but i dont, in no way shape or form, consider myself a proficient rider.. lol
i do understand both of your statements, and agree with both. but who cares. lol jk
all i know is that ive been itchin to take some track classes so i can learn and grow on the bike. i am very confident in my abilities on the street and feel no desire to take it to the limit. the track however is a whole different story.. TEACH ME YOUR WAYS!!
 

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I laugh at people who think chicken strips (or lack of) are an indicator of skill.
You can laugh at me all you want pal. It's not going to change my opinion when some douche brags about how great he is yet has 2" strips either side of his back tire.
 

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You know how a picture is worth a thousand words?
Considering the exchange between b.miller123 and LDH right above, these picture comes to mind.
LDH, I gotta admit, these pictures made more of an impression on me than anything I've seen or read lately. It shows EXACTLY what you and b.miller123 are talking about.
No more talk of chickenstrips for me...




 
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